I am Back!!

Hello! How are you? I’m back, or better, I should be back from the beginning of next year.

I’ve been so busy with my job and private life that I nearly forgotten about this Blog but I should have more free time from next year and I’d like to update you all on the topics we all love.

PS – few changes are planned for this Blog in 2019, stay tuned.

Social Innovation and New Solutions to Youth Unemployment: UK & Japan’s Emerging Youth Policy

12 March 2013

6:00 – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

13-14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle), London, NW14QP

In the UK, young people with low or no qualifications make up 39% of all young people unemployed and not in education, and 47% of those inactive and outside learning, despite only accounting for a quarter of the youth population. Tony Wilson, Policy Director of Inclusion, which delivers research and new approaches to policy that promote social inclusion in the labour market, will talk about the UK’s policy of intervention and provision of training to improve the employability of  British youth. His recent publications include the BIS research paper (Number 101) Youth Unemployment: Review of Training for Young People with Low Qualifications (Dept. for Business Innovation and Skills, February 2013).

From the 1960s onwards, Japan’s rapid economic growth generated internationally low levels of youth unemployment. This changed in the 1990s however, and by the 2000s, youth unemployment was recognised as a serious concern. Japan’s Emerging Youth Policy (Routledge, 2013) is based on extensive fieldwork that draws on both sociological and policy science approaches, and is the first book to investigate in detail how the state, experts, the media, and youth workers have reacted to the rise of youth joblessness in Japan. The book argues that entrepreneurial youth support leaders in Japan can provide sustainable, attractive solutions to the dilemmas that virtually all post-industrial nations currently face but have not yet seriously addressed. Dr Tuukka Toivonen, the author of the book, will discuss Japan’s emerging youth policy and attempt to bring evidence from Japan into a dialogue with the realities in other advanced nations, such as the UK.

Dr Tuukka Toivonen

Dr Tuukka Toivonen is Junior Research Fellow at Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, and is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Global Communications Centre (GLOCOM), the International University of Japan, Tokyo. He holds a DPhil in Social Policy from the University of Oxford, and is a graduate of Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University in Japan. He has held visiting positions at the universities of Kobe, Tokyo, Kyoto and Keio. He is a sociologist by training and has published several articles in world-class journals that comparatively analyse policy-making processes, youth problems and social innovations. He is also the co-editor of A Sociology of Japanese Youth: From Returnees to NEETs (Routledge, 2012). Currently, he is carrying out fieldwork on the evolution of social entrepreneurship and related innovation communities in Japan. Alongside his purely academic work, he also engages in social innovation activities himself as the founder and representative of Kansai RISE, which promotes young people’s creative involvement in public improvement and policy-making at regional level.

Tony Wilson

Tony Wilson joined Inclusion as Director in October 2011. He has more than ten years’ experience of policy and research, project management and delivery across a range of roles in HM Treasury, the Department for Work and Pensions and Jobcentre Plus. Since joining Inclusion, Tony has led on a range of projects including a feasibility study on developing a new employment programme in Northern Ireland, assessing approaches to tackling youth unemployment, the fragmentation of services for young people, and evaluations of programmes to increase employment among inactive groups. Most recently, Tony led on employment policy and delivery at HM Treasury: advising on labour market trends, policy responses to the downturn, delivery of welfare-to-work programmes and benefit reform. Prior to this he was responsible for the design and delivery of a number of Department for Work and Pensions employment projects. These included overseeing the development and introduction of the Future Jobs Fund, which created over 105,000 temporary jobs for long-term unemployed people. He was an expert policy adviser to David Freud on his independent review of welfare-to-work, published in 2007.

Organised by The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

BOOKING FORM

Education and Social Class in the UK and Japan

29 January 2013

6:00 – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:30pm

13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle), London NW1 4QP

Organised by Daiwa Anglo Japanese Foundation

According to UNICEF, 12.1% of children in the UK are living in poverty, while the figure for Japan is 14.9% (Innocenti Report Card 10, May 2012). Since this report was produced, the economic situation has, if anything, deteriorated in both countries.  Inequality and social exclusion have become concerns again, and in a time of austerity for both the government and parents, the role of education needs reconsidering. Can education contribute to better social mobility? Are working-class groups still under-represented in higher education, and if so, why? Although higher education has become more inclusive in both countries in recent decades, if investing in education does not necessarily guarantee a job, then what is the incentive for young people to aspire to go to university? Professor Robert Cassen of LSE will look at social exclusion and education, and at government policies aimed at making life chances more equal, in pre-school, primary and secondary education. Issues of gender and ethnicity will also be explored. Professor Takehiko Kariya of Oxford University will analyse a new educational selection mechanism that has contributed to rising disparity in learning motivations after Japan’s education reforms in the 1990s, and will offer important insights for understanding similar problems in other countries.

Robert Cassen

Robert Cassen is Visiting Professor at the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics. He held his first post at LSE in 1961, and subsequently was a Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies in Sussex, and Director of Queen Elizabeth House and Professor of Development Economics at Oxford. He also served on the staff of the UK Department for International Development, the British High Commission in New Delhi, the World Bank, and the Brandt Commission. His books include Does Aid Work? (with associates, Oxford University Press, 1994); with Tim Dyson and Leela Visaria,  21st Century, India: Population, Economy, Human Development and the Environment (Oxford University Press, 2004); and with Geeta Kingdon, Tackling Low Educational Achievement: a Report for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2007. In 2008 he received an OBE for services to education. He is currently working on a new book, with Anna Vignoles and Sandra McNally:Making a Difference: What Works in Education and What Doesn’t, to be published by Routledge in 2014.

Takehiko Kariya

Takehiko Kariya is a Professor in the Sociology of Japanese Society, at the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies and the Department of Sociology, University of Oxford and he is a Faculty Fellow of St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research interests include the sociology of education, social stratification, school- to-work transition, educational and social policies, and social changes in postwar Japan. Before he joined Oxford University, he had taught sociology of education at the Graduate School of Education, University of Tokyo for 18 years. He is co-editor of Challenges to Japanese Education: Economics, Reforms, and Human Rights (Teachers College Press, 2010), the author of Education Reform and Social Class in Japan (Routledge, 2012) and Japanese Education and Society in Transition: A Sociology of Education Reforms, Opportunities and Mass Education during the Lost Decades (Routledge, forthcoming), and he has published more than 20 books in Japanese.

BOOKING FORM

Korean Culture Forum: A Bridge to the Future

Wednesday 30th Jan 2013, 5PM

Multi-purpose Hall, KCCUK

The Korean Cultural Centre UK is pleased to host a Forum on Korean Culturefeaturing four cultural experts. Each speaker will talk on their specialised cultural sector, the present and future of Korean culture’s presence in the UK and of course the possible future direction of the KCCUK itself.

 

*Guest Speakers and Abstract

The KCCUK – A look back at the first five years

Philip Gowman (Founder and Editor of London Korean Links)

Korean culture in London did not start with the opening of the Korean Cultural Centre (KCCUK) in 2008. But the establishment of a cultural venue at a high profile location with a regular government-funded budget has undoubtedly helped take the presentation of Korean culture in the UK to a new level. Full-time staff can obviously deliver projects that are beyond the reach of voluntary organisations. But going beyond the organisation of events – stressful enough in itself – the KCCUK has been able to build relationships with premier arts organisations in London such as the South Bank Centre and the Institute of Contemporary Arts which has enabled Korean cultural events to be presented at mainstream venues and thus reach a more generalist audience; and a flourishing relationship with London City Hall has enabled the Korean Village to become a central attraction of The Mayor’s Thames Festival. What is surprising though is that, contrary to some expectations, the entry of the Korean government into the promotion of Korean culture has not squeezed out private sector and individual initiatives. This talk will look back at the KCCUK’s achievements in its first five years and consider them alongside some of the complementary private sector projects during that period.

 

The Korean Wave in the British Context

Dr. Hyunsun Yoon (Ph.D. Cardiff University, Senior Lecturer in Advertising, School of Arts and Digital Industries, University of East London)

The flood of the Korean popular culture – films, pop music and especially TV dramas – into the rest of Asia around since the late 1990s became to be known as the Korean wave, and this has also been swiftly making its presence felt in other parts of the world such as Europe. This paper examines the ways in which the Korean wave has been, and is discussed in the mainstream media in the UK for the last decade. Considering the wide range of examples from Old Boy to Gangnam Style,this paper poses a question of whether or not the Korean wave found its way in seemingly impermeable British culture.

 

Korean Art:  Self Portrait

Jeremy Akerman (Artist and Curator, Co-director of Akermandaly.com)

Adopting the position of an observer I’d like to talk about my experience of art school and how I see art school in the UK working for a Korean art student. I will refer to the visits I’ve made to Korea as a tourist, curator and artist and why I find Korean people’s attitudes to Korea paradoxical and stimulating. Especially here I’d like to mention some Korean artists and an art collection that changed my mind about how I understood the country. A further point is to express the metaphor of self-portraiture within young Korean art and to suggest ways in which KCC can support and engage this vital new work.

 

Connecting UK & Korean Performing Arts

Sioned Hughes (Director, SRH Arts Management, specialises in international professional development of people across the arts and creative industries). 

 I will share the experience of a 2-year research exchange programme for Korean and UK performing arts managers that promoted and supported collaborative exchange between Korean and UK arts producers; developed performing arts professional networks between Korea and the UK and encouraged the development of artistic collaboration.

 

Maritime Strategy and National Security in Japan and Britain: From the First Alliance to Post-9/11

3 October 2012

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Sharing a similar geography at the opposite ends of the Eurasian Continent, and dependent on maritime trade to supplement the lack of strategic resources, both the UK and Japan relied on the sea for their economic survival and independence as sovereign states. From the first alliance in 1902, through the World Wars, to the more recent operations in the Indian Ocean and Iraq, sea power has played a central role in the strategic calculus of both countries. This thought-provoking book, comprising contributions from a group of international scholars, explores the strategic meaning of being an island nation. It investigates how, across more than a century, sea power empowered – and continues to empower – both the UK and Japan with a defensive shield, an instrument of deterrence, and an enabling tool in expeditionary missions to implement courses of action to preserve national economic and security interests worldwide. At a time when Anglo-Japanese security relations are back on the agenda of the two governments, this book represents a timely work exploring the reasons for enhanced cooperation. Here is a link to an article by the author in the Asahi Shimbun Newspaper.

Dr Alessio Patalano

Dr Alessio Patalano is Lecturer in War Studies at the Department of War Studies, King’s College London, and specialises in Japanese naval history and strategy and contemporary maritime issues in East Asia. He is the Director of the Asian Security & Warfare Research Group and Research Associate at the King’s China Institute. In Japan, Dr Patalano has been a Visiting Scholar at Aoyama Gakuin University and at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), both in Tokyo, and currently is Adjunct Fellow at the Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies, Temple University Japan.

Dr Philip Towle (Chair)

Dr Philip Towle was Deputy Director of the Centre of International Studies in Cambridge from 1982 to 1993 and Director from 1993 to 1998. He retired in September 2012 and is now Visiting Professor at the University of Buckingham. Dr Towle joined Cambridge in 1980 following a period as a Senior Research Fellow at the Australian National University. His research interests are in East Asian security and the causes and the consequences of warfare. His most recent books have been: Going to War: British Debates from Wilberforce to Blair(Palgrave), From Ally to Enemy: Anglo- Japanese Military Relations, 1900-45 (Global Oriental), andBritain and Japan in the Twentieth Century: One Hundred Years of Trade and Prejudice (I. B. Tauris, edited with Margaret Kosuge).

BOOKING FORM

Director Talk: John Williams – Making Films in Japan

27 September 2012, from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London

John Williams is the most celebrated – if not the only – British film director working in Japanese film today. Growing up in Wales and having lived in Japan for 20 years, Williams has written and directed a number of feature films, both in Japanese language and performed by Japanese actors, which have earned him international film awards as well as a nomination for Best New Director by the Directors Guild of Japan for his 2001 film Firefly Dreams (Ichiban utsukushii natsu). In a market where it is indeed rare to see a non-Japanese director making films, Williams’ determination as a filmmaker has succeeded in establishing him as a prominent name in Japanese independent cinema, and in 1999 he formed his 100 Meter Films production group.Complementing the UK premiere of his most recent film Sado Tempest (Arashi) at this year’s Raindance Film Festival, the Japan Foundation has invited John Williams to reflect on his career to date as a filmmaker and the environment he has been working in within the Japanese film industry, particularly as a non-Japanese. Joined in conversation with Kieron Corless, Deputy Editor of Sight & Sound magazine, they will exchange views regarding independent filmmaking and establishing oneself as a feature film director. In countries where it is becoming increasingly hard to secure funding to make films, they will discuss the current situation in film production and distribution both in Japan and the UK.

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please email your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

Sumidagawa and Curlew River: Britten’s Encounter with Noh

6 September 2012

6:00 – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:15pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan’s leading specialist music and arts college, is staging back-to-back performances of the Noh play Sumidagawa and Benjamin Britten’s opera Curlew River, in London and Suffolk on 7 and 9 September (sumidagawa-curlewriver.com). Curlew River is closely based on Sumidagawa, which Britten saw twice when he visited Japan in 1953. In advance of these performances, this event aims to help audiences understand both pieces and put them into context. How does Sumidagawa fit into the Noh tradition? Why did this ancient Japanese art have such a powerful impact on Britten? And how did he digest his Japanese experiences as he produced Curlew River, shifting the locale from Tokyo’s Sumida River to the marshy landscapes of East Anglia, transforming the “capital birds” of the original into curlews, and replacing Buddhism with medieval Christianity? Whether you are able to attend the performances or not, the encounter between one of Japan’s most sophisticated art forms and the UK’s greatest 20th century composer is a fascinating story.

Professor Tomotaka Sekine

Professor Tomotaka Sekine began his stage career at the age of four playing the child parts in Kurama Tengu and Hibariyama, and gave his first shiteperformance in Tsunemasa in 1963. After graduating from Tokyo University of the Arts, he became a pupil of the 25th Kanze Soke Motomasa Sakon. Becoming independent in 1981, he gave performances ofShakkoMidare and Dojoji. Performing as a member of Kenkyu-Kai, Kanno-Kai and Mori-no-Kai, his Noh repertoire included OkinaKinutaMochizukiand Sotoba Komachi. He joined Tokyo University of the Arts as an associate professor in 2004, becoming a professor in 2010 (Department of Traditional Japanese Music, Kanze ’school of Noh’). In the university’s “Beauty of Traditional Japanese Music” programme, he collaborated with other art fields in presenting Konjaku Monogatari. He was certified Intangible Cultural Property, is a board member of the Kanze Association, a member of Kenkyu-Kai, and the chairman of Kangetsu-Kai.

Dr Daisaku Mukai

Dr Daisaku Mukai is a lecturer in musicology at Ueno Gakuen University, Tokyo. He has also been a research fellow at the Research Centre of the Graduate School of Music, Tokyo University of the Arts since 2009. His specialities are 20th century music and music aesthetics. He completed his PhD on Britten at Tokyo University of the Arts in 2008. In his dissertation entitled “Dramaturgy of invisible sounds in Benjamin Britten’s opera”, he analyses Britten’s musical dramaturgy, focusing on his leitmotiftechnique and the function of invisible sounds in his operatic works. He is now working on the study ofCurlew River and Britten’s relationship with Japan.

BOOKING FORM

Leadership and Corporate Life

12 July 2012

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

With the global economy in the doldrums, companies everywhere face difficult challenges. Japanese corporate leaders have two decades of experience with a sluggish economy, and may be able to offer lessons for their UK counterparts about how to respond to the current difficult environment. British companies are being urged by the government to export more, particularly to the Far East, echoing Japan’s experience, that exports have indeed been a relative bright spot in recent years. But the Japanese corporate sector isn’t in great shape either. Iconic exporters like Sony are struggling to compete with Asian and American rivals, while the Olympus scandal has reminded us that Japan still has deep-rooted governance and audit problems.

So what should corporate leaders in both countries have uppermost in their minds? Our two speakers are well-placed to comment. As well as being former Chairman of Airbus Japan, Glen Fukushima is well-known as a commentator on a wide range of issues relevant to the Japanese corporate sector – from trade policy to the educational system. Stuart Lyons, meanwhile, has broad experience of the UK corporate sector. He was formerly CEO of Royal Doulton (for whom Japan is an important market), and is currently Chairman of furniture manufacturer Airsprung Furniture group. This is the fifth seminar in our 2012 series Leadership: People and Power in the UK and Japan.

 

Glen S. Fukushima

Glen S. Fukushima was President and CEO (2005 – 2010) and Chairman and Director (2010 – 2012) of Airbus Japan. He has worked in Japan since 1990 as a senior executive in four US multinationals and served as Vice President and President of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan. He has served on numerous Japanese, American, and European corporate boards and advisory councils and is a Trustee of Keizai Doyukai (Japan Association of Corporate Executives). From 1985 to 1990, he worked in Washington DC as Director for Japanese Affairs and as Deputy Assistant USTR for Japan and China at the Office of the United States Trade Representative. His book The Politics of US-Japan Trade Conflict (in Japanese) was awarded the Masayoshi Ohira Prize in 1993. He was educated at Stanford (BA), Harvard (MA, JD), Keio (Stanford-Keio Exchange Scholar), and Tokyo (Fulbright and Japan Foundation Fellow).

Stuart Lyons

Stuart Lyons is Chairman of Airsprung Group PLC, the furniture and mattress manufacturer. After graduating in Classics from King’s College, Cambridge, he joined the retail and clothing group United Drapery Stores, where he rose to be managing director. Following a takeover, he became chief executive of Royal Doulton, where he led both the business itself and the industry confederation, receiving a CBE for services to the china industry. He has been a member of the Ordnance Survey Review Committee, the Monopolies & Mergers Commission, and the Council of Keele University, a governor of Staffordshire University and Chairman of the West Midlands Development Agency. More recently, he assisted the Conservative opposition as a chief policy advisor and authored three influential publications for the Centre for Policy Studies, Can Consignia Deliver?, A Department for Business and Harnessing our Genius.

Dr Simon Learmount (Chair)

Dr Simon Learmount is University Lecturer in Corporate Governance at the University of Cambridge. He has recently been awarded the University’s Pilkington Prize, which recognises excellence in teaching. Prior to joining the University of Cambridge, Dr Learmount was founder and Managing Director of Saxoncourt Ltd, Director of Sales and Marketing at International Packaging Ltd and Shimomura Fellow at the Development Bank of Japan. His main teaching and research interests lie in the areas of international corporate governance reform and management practice; currently he is particularly interested in the training and development of senior executives and company directors. He has consulted to a number of organisations around the world, including the Tokyo Stock Exchange, BT, Rolls Royce, Coca Cola, BP, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, Agricultural Bank of China and Roche. He has lived and worked in Japan, the US, France and Spain.

Hedge Fund Activism in Japan: The Limits of Shareholder Primacy

5 July 2012

6:00 – 7:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Hedge fund activism is an expression of shareholder primacy, an idea that has come to dominate discussion of corporate governance theory and practice worldwide over the past two decades. This book provides a thorough examination of public and often confrontational hedge fund activism in Japan in the period between 2001 and the full onset of the global financial crisis in 2008. In Japan this shareholder-centric conception of the company espoused by activist hedge funds clashed with the alternative Japanese conception of the company as an enduring organisation or a ‘community’. By analysing this clash, the book derives a fresh view of the practices underpinning corporate governance in Japan and offers suggestions regarding the validity of the shareholder primacy ideas currently at the heart of US and UK beliefs about the purpose of the firm.

Dr John Buchanan

Dr John Buchanan is a research associate at the Centre for Business Research, Judge Business School, University of Cambridge. His first degree was in oriental studies and subsequently he worked as a commercial banker in Brazil, Japan and Spain, and then as an investment banker in the UK and Japan, at both British and Japanese banks. He has been studying Japanese corporate governance since 2002.

Professor Simon Deakin

Professor Simon Deakin is Professor of Law in the Faculty of Law and Fellow of Peterhouse at the University of Cambridge. He has directed an interdisciplinary programme of research on corporate governance at the Centre for Business Research in Cambridge since the early 1990s. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2005.

The book will be available on the day at the discounted price of £48.

BOOKING FORM

Women and Leadership

22 May 2012

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The fourth seminar in our 2012 series Leadership: People and Power in the UK and Japan looks at Women and Leadership.  Japan remains one of the OECD’s poorest performers on gender equality issues, despite numerous attempts over the years to improve the situation. Only 11.3% of Japanese Diet members are women (a proportion recently surpassed by South Korea, with 14.7%). A survey of listed companies by Toyo Keizai last year found that women accounted for just 1.4% of management positions. And what about the UK, which elected its first female Prime Minister over 30 years ago? Even here, men in leadership positions still far outnumber women, and the gender debate is very much alive. Do we need quotas for female representation at the highest levels?  Our Japanese speaker is Dr Wakako Hironaka, one of the few women at the top level of Japanese politics, who became a State Minister almost 20 years ago, at a time when it was very difficult for women to succeed in this field. Our UK speaker is Suzi Digby OBE, Founder and Principal of The Voices Foundation, well-known as both a charity leader and a choral conductor. The seminar will be chaired by Joanna Pitman, former Tokyo Bureau Chief of The Times.

Dr Wakako Hironaka

Dr Wakako Hironaka is a former Member of the House of Councillors (1986-2010) and a former Vice-Chair of the Democratic Party of Japan.  Among her many roles, she has served as State Minister, Director-General of the Environment Agency (1993-94), Chair of the Committee on Fundamental National Policies, and Chair of the EU-Japan Parliamentary Group. Dr Hironaka has also been active internationally, as a Vice-Chair of Global Environmental Action, Chair of GLOBE Japan, and member of the World Commission on Forests and Sustainable Development, the Earth Charter Initiative, and International Science Advisory Board of UNESCO. She currently serves as Director-General of GEA, and as a Board Member of the Energy and Resources Institute, Earth Charter Commission and PA International Foundation. She was awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun by the Emperor Akihito in 2010.

Suzi Digby OBE (Lady Eatwell)

Suzi Digby OBE (Lady Eatwell) is an internationally renowned Choral Conductor and Music Educator. Born in Japan, Suzi lived internationally before settling in London/Cambridge. She has trailblazed the revival of singing in UK schools and the community over two decades. Suzi founded and runs four influential arts/education organisations: The Voices Foundation (the UK’s leading Music Education Charity); Voce Chamber Choir (one of London’s finest young Chamber Choirs); Vocal Futures (Nurturing young [16-22] audiences for Classical Music); and Artsworks (Leadership and ‘Accelerated Learning’ for Corporates). She is a Professor at the University of Southern California, where she is creating a Masters in Arts Leadership. As a conductor, Suzi’s 2011 debut with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (Vocal Futures’ Bach’s St Matthew Passion) was met with outstanding critical acclaim. Suzi is Trustee of Music in Country Churches, among other music and education charities. She is President of the Incorporated Society of Musicians and was Acting Music Director of Queens’ College, University of Cambridge. Amongst many TV appearances, she was judge in the BBC1 show, Last Choir Standing.

Joanna Pitman (chair)

Joanna Pitman was educated at Cambridge University where she read Japanese Studies. On graduating, she worked for a number of financial magazines in London before joining The Times. In 1989 she was appointed Tokyo Bureau Chief of The Times, a post she held for six years covering all news out of Japan and major stories in the region. Back in London, she became a writer on international affairs for The Times and did a series of major political interviews for the paper. Changing course, she spent ten years as an arts critic on The Times, and then when her children were older, she joined the strategic intelligence company, Hakluyt & Co. She is a trustee of Somerset House and of the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation. She has written two books: On Blondes(2004) and The Raphael Trail (2006).

BOOKING FORM

Leadership in Central Banking

23 February 2012

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Leadership in Central Banking

Central banks currently face unusual challenges. In both the UK and Japan, the normal policy lever – interest rates – is at or close to its limits, forcing central bankers to consider innovative measures, such as “quantitative easing” (QE), to support their economies. But these measures have been controversial. Some argue that the Japanese experience shows that QE doesn’t work, while others say that the real problem is the Bank of Japan’s cautiousness. In the UK, critics argue that QE has failed to boost the economy, debased the currency, and pushed up inflation. In the meantime, savers and pensioners in both countries have been squeezed by unusually low returns on their investments. In this seminar, the second in the 2012 series Leadership: People and Power in the UK and Japan, we ask what lessons can be learnt from the Bank of Japan’s experience over the last two decades – and what central bankers in both countries should do next?

Satoshi Kawazoe

Satoshi Kawazoe has been General Manager for Europe and Chief Representative in London at the Bank of Japan since May 2011. Prior to this, Mr. Kawazoe was General Manager of the Bank’s Shizuoka branch (2009-2011). Mr. Kawazoe held several other posts at the Bank, generally relating to international relations. In that capacity, he represented the Bank in various fora, such as the Committee on the Global Financial System and the Markets Committee, which regularly meet at the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, discussing developments and issues in the international financial markets and the economy.

Stephen King

Stephen King is HSBC’s Group Chief Economist and the Bank’s global head of economics and asset allocation research. Since 2001, Mr. King has been writing a weekly column for The Independent. He has given written and oral evidence to the House of Commons Treasury Committee and the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee, and oral evidence to the House of Lords Committee on UK Monetary Policy. Between 2007 and 2009, he was a member of the European Central Bank Shadow Council, and he recently became a member of the Financial Times Economists’ Forum. His first book,Losing Control (Yale University Press) examines the impact of the emerging nations on western economic prosperity.

Edward Carr (Chair)

Edward Carr is Foreign Editor of The Economist. Carr started at the paper as a science correspondent. In 2000 he left for the Financial Times, where he served as News Editor. Returning to The Economistin 2005, Mr. Carr was Business Affairs Editor, charged with the coverage of business, finance and science.

Muse London:The 4th UK Korean Artists Exhibition

16 December 2011 – 21 January 2012

The Korean Cultural Centre UK presents the 4th Annual Exhibition of contemporary art by UK Korean Artists.

 Focusing on video works, ‘Muse London’ brings together the exciting work of six artists, all living and working in London.

 Participating artists:

Eemyun KANG, Seokyeong KANG, EE, Wonwoo LEE, Sean ROH and Kiwoun SHIN

 From 16 December 2011 to 21 January 2012 the exhibition MUSE LONDON brings a showcase of Contemporary Media Art to the KCC.

 The exhibition dwells more specifically on the artists’ interior world as seen through the lens of a foreign world city. The artworks give highly personal reports of the ‘London experience’ told through interviews, documentary snippets, exotic fantasy, paranoia and studied reflections.

 The exhibition has been guest curated by Jeremy AKERMAN and managed Ji Hye HONG (KCC UK).

 I.The participating artists for the exhibition ‘MUSE LONDON: THE 4th UK KOREAN ARTISTS EXHIBITION’ are, in alphabetical order:

 1.EE is currently studying MA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design. <Maniac> video clip presents a unique persona of this husband-and-wife duo. With the element of kitsch and pop culture of its shiny and amusing surface, EE delivers the explosion and clash in its own way of irony and humour.

  2.Eemyun KANG completed Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art at the Royal Academy of Arts, London. She launched the interviews with artists to share diverse idea and approaches on the idea of Mystic Island in London. The video clip brings a poetic rhythm made by layers of interview. This intriguing corresponding is later developed to various forms of art. Her canvasses capture the imaged landscape that continues endlessly.   

 3.Seokyeong KANG is currently undertaking an MA in Painting at the Royal College of Art in London. By reshoot in the space of KCC, the mirror-like simulacrum leads the audience to come across with the ethereal traces of memory.  Her formal interest in emptiness, blank space and emotional movement is coupled with an intuitive understanding of leftovers such as leathers, threads and fabric.   

 4.Wonwoo LEE is currently studying an MA in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art, London. His practice is concerned with spatial interventions, transforming objects and phenomenon which is related in physical and social realm. He focuses on making actual happenings that can change the given situations turned into imaginary and uncanny situations. <A drummer’s room> is stemmed from the personal experience of spatial change by occupation of sound.

 5.Sean ROH is studying an MFA in Media at Slade School of Fine Art, University College London. With his witty manipulation of ordinary objects that found in everyday life, he makes a stage of storytelling. Based on his series of photographs, the ordinary life and episodes in London is told in first point of view. Every scene speaks volume for itself.

 6.Kiwoun SHIN completed MFA Fine Art at Goldsmiths College in 2010. The visual analysis of the existence expands the his experiments from grinding to evaporating.   <Missing time never exist> and <News becomes entertainment> is a record while a cup of wine was evaporated. While he tries to emphasise and make the scenes more dramatic and theatrical with music, Kiwoun explores the political layer and visual icons of media and eventually questions the visual reality.  

 II.Guest Curator: Jeremy AKERMAN

Jeremy is an artist and editor of artists’ writing. He is an independent curator with a deep enthusiasm for Korean art in particular. <MUSE LONDON> is Jeremy’s second Exhibition at the KCC with the emerging young Korean artists.  

 III.The Korean Cultural Centre UK      

Director: WON Yonggi    

The Korean Cultural Centre UK (KCCUK) was opened by the Korean Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism in January 2008 under the aegis of the London Embassy of the Republic of Korea. The role of the KCCUK is to further enhance friendship, amity and understanding between Korea and the UK through cultural and educational activities.

 From the KCCUK's central London location near Trafalgar Square, its dedicated cultural team work to further develop cultural projects, introduce new opportunities to expand their Korean events programme in the UK, and encourage cultural exchange. Facilities at the centre include a gallery, small theatre, lecture room, a multimedia centre and library.

The return of the Routemaster: a new version of classic double-decker bus

The Mayor of London Boris Johnson has unveiled the modern day equivalent of London’s famous double-decker bus which will be built in Ballymena.

The new bus, which will be manufactured by Wrightbus, will go into service in London in time for the 2012 Olympics.

A life-size mock-up of the double-decker was unveiled at the London Transport Museum’s depot at Acton on Thursday.

Wrightbus was awarded the tender in December.

The Mayor has been a long time champion of London’s famous Routemaster bus which is the inspiration for the design.

“Standing on the rear platform of this delectable bus brings back a sense of nostalgia but conversely also demonstrates the quintessence of the latest technology and design, making this bus fit for 21st century London,” he said.

“It is wonderful to see how those two-dimensional designs we unveiled in May have been forged into this amazing bus and I for one cannot wait to be launching the buses when they first enter passenger service in 2012.”

The new bus will have an open platform similar to the old Routemaster buses and will see the return of the traditional hop-on-hop-off service.

Mark Nodder, group managing director of Wright Group, said: “Finally seeing the design for this revolutionary new bus come to life is a real thrill for all of us.

“We’re excited to hear the reactions of stakeholders and future passengers as we complete this milestone in development and move nearer to production.”

A prototype will be delivered late next year with the first five buses due to enter passenger service in early 2012.

From BBC

Zipangu Fest (ジパング・フェスト)

Zipangu Fest (ジパング・フェスト) is the first UK-wide festival devoted to Japanese film, introducing works new and old, many previously unseen by mainstream UK film audiences, to demonstrate the many identities of Japan as depicted by some of the country’s most exciting and revered talents.

Zipangu Fest operates as a UK-registered non-profit organisation, formed in the best interest of developing a new appreciation in the UK of Japanese film talents.

Zipangu Fest 2011 has been realised thanks to the following people:

Organising committee:
Festival Director & Chief Curator Jasper Sharp (http://jaspersharp.com/blog/about)
Assistant Curator Julian Ross
Producer Fei Phoon
Producer Tun Shwe
Press Relations Sarah Macdonald
Guest Relations Nikhila Anoth
Guest Relations Almudena Escobar Lopez
Guest Relations & Operations Eve Choomsawat
Operations Jia Luo
Print Shipping Garfman Leung
Video Editing Momoko Abe
Cover Artist Mike Lomon (http://michaellomon.com)

Special thanks to our sponsors and partners:
The Japan Foundation (http://www.jpf.org.uk)
The Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation (http://gbsf.org.uk)
Japan Visualmedia Translation Academy (http://www.jvtacademy.com/english)
The SRK (http://thesrk.com)
Kinema Nippon (http://kinemanippon.org)
Branchage Film Festival (http://branchagefestival.com)
Electric Sheep (http://electricsheepmagazine.co.uk)
VCinema (http://variedcelluloid.net/vcinema)
Tsuru (http://tsuru-sushi.co.uk)
National Film Center, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (http://www.momat.go.jp/english/nfc)
Coventry East Asian Film Society (http://cueafs.com)
Cafe OTO (http://cafeoto.co.uk)
Institute of Contemporary Arts, London (http://ica.org.uk)
Neil Cantwell (http://www.dissolvingpath.com) & Tim Grabham (http://thesrk.com/795469/Tim-Grabham)
Aily Nash & Nine Yamamoto-Massan
Bo Ningen (http://myspace.com/boningen)
Erlend Palm
Sayaka Smith
Third Window Films (http://thirdwindowfilms.com)
Terracotta Distribution (http://terracottadistribution.com)
Sirida Pensri & Stefan Holliland

For further information click here

COP 17 and Beyond: Japan-UK and Global Action for Addressing Climate Change

11 November 2011 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London
Russell Square House
10-12 Russell Square
London, WC1B 5EH 

From late November to December, delegates from all over the world will meet in COP17 in Durban, South Africa to establish a new framework in order to continue to tackle the issue of climate change. Before the start of this conference, the Japan Foundation will host a special lecture here in London inviting four professionals representing both Japanese and European perspectives – the event will be moderated by Oliver Morton, currently senior editor at The Economist, where he was until recently Energy and Environment Editor.

Prof Mitsutsune Yamaguchi will deliver a presentation entitled ‘In search of an effective and feasible international framework – A balanced approach’ about Japanese policy on climate change issues and the rationale underlying it. Prof. M. Yamaguchi is an environmental economist and Project Professor at the University of Tokyo. He is a member of various Government committees on climate change and has been a lead author for the IPCC 3rd, 4thand 5th assessment reports.

Dr Robert Falkner, Senior Lecturer in International Relations and Associate, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment will discuss ‘What future for international climate policy? Durban and beyond’. The talk will focus on the prospects for a future framework agreement on climate mitigation and the options available for advancing climate policy through multilateral channels.

Dan Dorner, Senior Energy Analyst at the International Energy Agency (IEA), will present the key climate change findings from the Agency’s flagship publication, the World Energy Outlook 2011, focusing on the latest data, policy developments and scenario projections for the next 25 years.

Jun Arima, special advisor to the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry for Global Environmental Affairs and Director-General of JETRO London, will discuss ‘COP17 and beyond – Japan’s view on a fair and effective international framework”’ based on his experience as Japan’s chief negotiator at the COP14, 15 and 16 and the on-going UNFCCC negotiation.

This event is supported by the Embassy of Japan, JETRO London and ANA

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please email your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.