Grilled Rats Are a Tasty Snack

Rat

Grilled Rats Are a Tasty Snack In Phitsanulok

In the winter, Phitsanulok locals like to eat “grilled field rats.” The prices of cooked rats then increase to 250 THB per kg. Popular rat dishes include fried field rats, curry field rat, and fried field rats with garlic. Residents believe that eating rats warms the body

PHITSANULOK – January 24, 2013 [PDN]; on a winter’s day, a reporter driving in Phitsanulok province noticed a big poster on the side of the road, which said “Grilled Rats.” The sign was on the roadside along the route going from Sukhothai to Pitsanulok in Tambon Phaikhordorn, about 10 km from Phitsanulok.

The reporter stopped and talked to the rat-selling owner, Mrs. Somboon Yuyen, age 50, who lives on Tharmmul road, Amphur Meuang, Chainart province.

She said that selling grilled rats is a business that provides revenues to many families in the area. In winter, many local people like to eat grilled rats and come to buy her rats. Sometimes there are so many customers, she runs out of grilled rats to sell.

Mrs. Somboon has been selling grilled field rats for about 7 years. In the decade before that, she used to mainly catch the field rats to sell to the grilled rat shops. Back then the price would be 30 THB per kg. Her revenue would total only 200 THB per day.

Then the wholesale rat prices increased to 80-100 THB per kg. However, the grilled rats had a higher price of 150 THB per kg. So Ms. Somboon and her husband began to catch the field rats to grill and sell themselves.

The rat-grilling business was going well, with a steadily increasing number of consumers. So Mrs. Somboon began to go to other provinces to buy more field rats in the lower northern and central Thailand areas.

She bought field rats from rice field owners that fetched high prices according to the demands of the sellers. Prices would average 100 THB per kg of rats, but sometimes reached 150 THB per kg. Mrs. Somboon would freeze the rats and store them, to be grilled later for hungry customers.

Mrs. Somboon said there seems to be more demand for grilled rats than in the past. So she has been traveling around and selling her rats in many lower north provinces, including Chainart province, Pijit province and Pitsanulok province. Business has been good in Phitsanulok, where she has been selling rats for five months, so she has no immediate plans to move.

The prices for her rats vary according to size. For the small size rats, the price is 200 THB per kg; the medium size rats sell for 220 THB per kg; and big rats sell for 250 THB per kg.

Although she considers the prices of rats to be expensive, the people who like to eat rats consider it a cheap price to pay. For people who want to grill their rats at home, her frozen field rats are priced at 180 THB per kg.

Some customers buy 3-5 kg of frozen rats each time to store in their refrigerators, and also buy rats for their relatives and friends. Most of her customers are local people, and some are drivers passing by who notice her shop.

Selling grilled field rats is an occupation that Mrs. Somboon is proud of, and can generate revenues up to 1 million THB a year. Mrs. Somboon averages more than 2,000-3,000 THB daily in sales. During the festivals, she can earn more than 10,000 THB daily.

Mrs. Somboon now enjoys a better financial status because of her business. She bought a pickup truck to buy more rats in many places, and can now build her own house from the money she made selling rats.

 Article and picture taken from Pattayadailynews.
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Chinese New Year Celebrations 2012 in Thailand

Bangkok, January 11, 2012 — The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) will mark the 37th Anniversary of Thai-Chinese diplomatic relations between January 19-29, 2012 with a range of lively, colourful Chinese New Year festivities in Bangkok and ten provinces nationwide. This year’s celebrations will be even more special than the previous years as it coincides with three other auspicious occasions that are very significant to the Thai people. These three auspicious occasions are the 84th Birthday of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the 80th Birthday of Her Majesty Queen Sirikit, and the 60th Birthday of His Royal Highness Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn.In cooperation with the Chinese Government, various Thai-Chinese associations, government agencies and private companies, the celebrations will be held in Chiang Mai, Nakhon Sawan, Suphan Buri, Ratchaburi, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Chon Buri, Nakhon Ratchasima, Songkhla, Phuket and Trang. Here is the full list:

NAKHON SAWAN CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL 2012, January 16 – 27, 2012,
throughout the city of Nakhon SawanThe province of Nakhon Sawan is known to the locals by its other name — Pak Nam Pho. This is where the Ping, Wang, Yom, and Nan Rivers converge to form the Chao Phraya River — the ‘River of Kings’. Hence, the province is frequently referred to as the ‘gateway’ to the North.

Nakhon Sawan is famous for the Chao Pho-Chao Mae Pak Nam Pho Fair and procession, organised by Thais of Chinese ancestry in Nakhon Sawan province during the Chinese New Year celebrations. The festivities are held in honour of Chao Pho Pak Nam Pho, a highly revered deity; hence, the origin of its name.

Special performance of folk dances from the city of Xinji in Hebei province in northern China will be performed on January 24-26, 2012.

Local residents seek blessings for the 2012 Chinese New Year – the Year of the Dragon – by paying homage to Chao Pho and Chao Mae Pak Nam Pho, the guardian spirits of Nakhon Sawan province. Visitors and residents are invited to take part in merit-making activities at Lan Bun Thepachao, the Garden of Chinese Deities.

SINO-SIAMESE RELATIONSHIP FESTIVAL, January 20 – 22, 2012, 17.00 – 21.00 hrs at the Ayutthaya Tourism Centre (Old Provincial Hall)Ayutthaya provincial authorities have received exceptional cooperation and support from the People’s Republic of China Ministry of Culture in jointly staging a spectacular cultural showcase as part of the province’s Sino-Siamese Relationship Festival – a celebration of Chinese as well as Thai culture.

The cultural showcase sponsored by the Chinese state authorities will be presented by a cast of 180 performers from Inner Mongolia, the city of Xinji in Hebei province in northern China, Qinghai Tibetan (Qingzang) Plateau, and Kansu province.

This includes a performance by the Chinese National Orchestra, a live demonstration of kung fu martial arts and Chinese acrobatics. Visitors will be presented with an opportunity to taste a wide variety of Thai and Chinese delicacies and shop for products from the PRC such as fine Chinese silks and ceramic and porcelain products from Jiangxi province, the home of Chinese porcelain.

NAKHON RATCHASIMA (KORAT) CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL, January 20 – 25, 2012, at the Thao Suranaree Memorial Plaza, Suan Suranaree (Suranaree Park) Suan Anusornstan (Anusornstan Park) in Nakhon Ratchasima provincial centre and town (Amphoe Mueang)The 2012 Chinese New Year celebrations in Nakhon Ratchasima province, also known as Korat, are being staged under the theme “In Search of Chin Shi”. The cultural highlights being presented as part of the festivities pay tribute to the first great emperor of the Chin Dynasty, Chin Shih Huang-ti (also known as Qin Shi Huang or Qin Er Shi).

Festival activities will take place in several dedicated zones such as Chinatown, The Forbidden Palace on the Central Stage, cultural performances and Food Street with a multitude of shops and food stalls offering a great variety of delicious food.

HAT YAI CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL, January 21 – 25, 2012, at Srinakhorn Foundation School, Songkhla province.The festive highlights include 1) a ceremony hosted in honour of His Majesty the King, 2) Chinese acrobatic show from Kansu province, the People’s Republic of China, 3) a spectacular fireworks and light-and-sound show with colourful bursts of fireworks taking the shape of waterfalls, silver dragon and golden dragon, 3) Silver dragon, Golden dragon and Lion Dance show from Nakhon Sawan province, 4) concert by Chinese singers and Nadech and Yaya – both popular local artists representing Thai TV Channel 3, 5) Miss Hatyai Chinese 2012 contest and China Doll 2012 contest, 6) international karaoke singing contest, and 7) local residents and visitors are invited to take part in merit-making activities and pay homage to nine sacred gods in accordance with Chinese customs and traditions.
RATCHABURI CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL, January 22 – 26, 2012, in front of the Ratchaburi National MuseumThe highlight will be a demonstration of Kung fu martial arts from Beijing, PRC. The Ratchaburi Chinatown Procession, water screen and fireworks display and Young Mr & Miss Chinatown contest and Mr and Miss Chinatown contest will be held on January 24 – 26.
BANGKOK CHINATOWN CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL 2012, Grand Opening Ceremony on January 23, 2012, at Chalermphrakiat Gate, Odeon Circle, Yaowarat Road, Sampantawong District, BangkokHer Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn will preside at the Bangkok Chinatown Chinese New Year official opening ceremony on January 23. Two shows – one featuring a Thai cultural showcase and the other hosted and presented by the People’s Republic of China Ministry of Culture. This will be followed by a 1.5 hour Yaowaraj Cultural Showcase.
CHIANG MAI CHINATOWN CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL, January 23 – 24, 2012, at Lao Chow Lane, Chiang MaiThe Chiang Mai Chinatown Chinese New Year Festival presents a rare opportunity to enjoy a musical performance by the Chinese National Opera on January 24. Witness the Golden Dragon and Golden Lion Procession and a cultural procession staged by the province’s ethnic Chinese Tai Seua tribes people.
SUPHAN BURI CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL, January 23 – 29, 2012, at the Museum of the Descendants of the Dragon in Suphan BuriThe grand opening ceremony of the Suphan Buri Chinese New Year Festival will be held on January 24 and the cultural performances will be held on January 24 – 29, 2012. The programme of engaging cultural presentations from the People’s Republic of China features the following highlights ; 1) Thousand Arms Kuan Yin, Goddess of Mercy and Compassion, 2) Chinese acrobatic performance, 3) light and pyrotechnics show and Heavenly Glowing Dragon display, 4) fireworks show, and 5) folk music performance.
AYUTTHAYA ANCIENT CITY CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL 2012, January 24 – 29, 2012, at Naresuan Road from Chao Phrom Market to Chao Ai Chao Yi Chedi.Major highlights include a Dragon Contest, Chinese teng leng lantern displays, Young Miss Chinese contest, the Best of Ayutthaya Food Festival and the Chinese food eating contest.

Dragon contest: The procession staged by the 108 Chinese shrines in the 16 districts of Ayutthaya province presents an opportunity for local residents to pay homage to Chinese deities and guardian spirits who watch over them and ensure their good fortune and well-being.

The Best of Ayutthaya Food Festival and a retro-market are staged to capture the atmosphere of traditional markets in times past. The event is being organised with the support of organisations representing various Chinese family names.

PHUKET CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL 2012, January 28 – 30, 2012, at Phuket Old Town – Klang Road, Thalang Road, Thepkasatri Road, Phuket.The festive highlights include 1) a procession in honour of His Majesty the King, 2) Baba Yaya Peranakan Procession, 3) journey back in time as Old Phuket turns back the clock and visitors are treated to a rare performance of a Portuguese-style stage play presented by the Thai Peranakan Association based in Phuket town, 4) local cultural showcase with colourful presentations of local culture, traditions and way of life on the tropical island paradise of Phuket, and 5) Phuket residents observe time-honoured traditions and pay homage to the highly revered Goddess Kuan Yin and other Chinese deities and guardian spirits.

For further information on Chinese New Year celebrations in Thailand, please check outhttp://www.tatnews.org/events/events/2012/jan/5775.asp

Thai Fruit Festival

THAI FRUIT FESTIVAL

May – July 2011

Throughout Thailand, a vast selection of fresh fruits are available all year round. However for a taste of the very best of Thai fruits, the height of the summer in May and June is the peak season. During this time of the year, a delightful assortment of exotic Thai fruits come into season.

Crispy and crunchy raw mango or ripe mangos juicy and full of flavour; sweet and fragrant bananas and custard apples; succulent fragrant longkong and zalacca; tangy thirst-quenching langsat and mangosteens; sweet rambutans, longans and jackfruit with thick, fleshy pulp; and rich, creamy durians. Refreshing and nutritious choices abound.

As succulent fruits ripen on the trees and are ready for harvest, fruit orchards in many of the eastern provinces of Thailand such as Chanthaburi, Rayong and Trat are open to visitors, presenting wonderful opportunities for private tours of the orchards and plantations, and agrotourism. Several offer fresh fruit buffets and ‘all-you can eat and pick’ at irresistible prices.

With a ready supply of freshly-picked fruits from the nearby orchards throughout the summer months from May to July, the annual ‘Fruit Festivals’ feature a vast array of quality local produce considered to be the provinces’ “best” and are the perfect place to savour the very best of a great variety of fresh Thai fruits, as well as locally processed fruit.

The annual fruit festival is extremely popular and attracts visitors from miles around because it provides a welcome opportunity to shop for products of exceptional quality, at truly bargain prices.

Colourful entertainment presents an added plus. In addition to contests such as the Fruit Festival Parade featuring a procession of floats decorated with fruit, the “Best Float”, creatively decorated with fruit, fruit contests including quality product contests such as “Best Fruits” (durian, rambutan, mangosteen and longkong), “Best Processed Fruits”. Other highlights include demonstrations of food-processing, fruit-eating contests, and the ever-popular beauty contest.

As the various types of fruits come into season at different intervals throughout the year, many other fruit fairs are held around the kingdom.

In addition to the sales of freshly-picked fruit, fruit contests, displays of agricultural and horticultural produce and sales of local handicrafts and products from each of the villages promoted under the OTOP – One Tambon One Product theme, the procession of colourful floats decorated with fruit and flowers paraded through the streets, beauty pageants, cultural performances and folk entertainment add to the festive ambience of the events.

For more information click here.

Asians All Look The Same

Parecchi anni fa’, quando sono venuto a Londra per studiare l’inglese, mi sono trovato in classe con diversi studenti provenienti da paesi come Giappone, Cina, Thailandia, Corea ed altri paesi Asiatici e tra noi studenti Italiani o di altre nazioni non Asiatiche era luogo comune dire che gli studenti provenienti da qui paesi si assomigliavano tutti e che spesso era facile far confusione e confonderli. Da parte loro, gli studenti Asiatici, ribattevano che noi Occidentali abbiamo caratteristiche fisiche che ci accomunano e quindi per loro un Italiano e’ facilmente confondibile con uno Spagnolo o un Tedesco o un’Inglese. Le discussioni che iniziavo in classe spesso continuavano alla sera in bar o pub dove dopo un po’ di birre ci si metteva alla prova. A distanza di anni penso di riconoscere facilmente un Giapponese da un Cinese o un Coreano da un Thailandese. Voi riuscite a riconoscere la provenienza di una persona Asiatica? Provate a mettervi alla prova con uno dei tanti video reperibile su youtube.

Many years ago, when I came to London to learn English, I met many students from Asian countries such as Japan, China, Thailand, South Korea, etc. Amongst Italian and other Western students it was very common to say things like ‘all Asians look the same’. Asian students, when confronted with our stupid comments, usually replied saying that all Western people look the same and that there were not too many physical differences between Italians and Spanish or Italians and Germans and so on. Friendly discussion which had started at college carried on in the evenings in bars or pubs where after few beers we would challenge classmates to recognise origin of friends or people seen in public places. After many years I confidently can spot a Japanese from a Chinese or a Korean. Can you do the same? Try to test you skills with one of the many videos available on youtube.

Radio

Oggi scrivo un post molto breve che, pero’, potrebbe essere utile a tutte le persone appassionate di musica. Vi lascio alcun link per ascoltare radio Giapponesi, Thailandesi e Coreane. Spero vi possano essere utili.

Today a short post that might be useful to those interested in music as I’m going to provide some links which allow you to listen to Japanese, Thai and Korean radios. I hope you find them helpful.

Japanese radio

http://www.xamfm.com/

http://it.delicast.com/radio/Giappone

http://www.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/english/radio/program/index.html

Korean radio

http://it.delicast.com/radio/CoreaSud

Thai radio

http://it.delicast.com/radio/Thailandia