Yayoi Kusama Curator Talk by Frances Morris

24 May 2012 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London

Yayoi Kusama, with a career spanning over half a century, is undoubtedly one of the most prolific Japanese artists of her generation. From paintings to installations, her considerable body of work is very diverse, reflecting her own hybrid identity. Kusama is now Japan’s most prominent contemporary artist and presenting her work to an international audience represents an exciting and ambitious curatorial challenge.

Frances Morris, Curator and Head of Collections (International Art) at Tate Modern has conceived and led a major exhibition project to bring Kusama’s work to Tate Modern. Her long relationship with Kusama and her work has culminated in the major retrospective, Yayoi Kusama, (8 February – 5 June 2012). At this special talk event, Morris will explore Kusama and her work, considering her relevance and significance on both a global and a UK scale. Guiding the audience through her curatorial process, she will map out the exhibition from conception to completion, also reflecting on her own personal journey with Kusama, having had the opportunity to work closely with her and really get under her skin as an artist.

This promises to provide a fantastic complement to the exhibition, offering a refreshing and dynamic perspective, and an opportunity to meet the curator behind what is arguably currently the most talked-about international show in London.

This talk event has proved so popular since being announced that unfortunately it is now only possible to register to be placed on the waiting list.

To register for the waiting list, please e-mail event@jpf.org.uk with your name, details and those of any guests.

This event is organised in association with Tate Modern.

Picasso and Modern British Art

15 February  –  15 July 2012

Picasso remains the twentieth century’s single most important artistic figure, a towering genius who changed the face of modern art.

In a major new exhibition at Tate Britain, Picasso and Modern British Art explores his extensive legacy and influence on British art, how this played a role in the acceptance of modern art in Britain, alongside the fascinating story of Picasso’s lifelong connections to and affection for this country.

It brings together over 150 spectacular artworks, with over 60 stunning Picassos including sublime paintings from the most remarkable moments in his career, such asWeeping Woman 1937 and The Three Dancers 1925.

It offers the rare opportunity to see these celebrated artworks alongside seven of Picasso’s most brilliant British admirers, exploring the huge impact he had on their art: Duncan Grant, Wyndham Lewis, Ben Nicholson, Henry Moore, Francis Bacon, Graham Sutherland and David Hockney.

Picasso and Modern British Art is the first exhibition to trace Picasso’s rise in Britain as a figure of both controversy and celebrity. From his London visit in 1919, working on the scenery and costumes for Diaghilev’s ballet The Three Cornered Hat; to his post-war reputation and political appearances; leading up to the phenomenally successful 1960 Tate exhibition.

Full of beautiful and inspirational artworks, this exhibition is an unmissable treat and a fascinating insight into how British art became modern.

Artist talk: Over the Parched Field

16 February 2012

6:00 – 7:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Akiko Takizawa is a Japanese artist based in London. The exhibition, Over the Parched Field, showcases a selection of Takizawa’s photographs since 2006, including new works made especially for the exhibition. This is Takizawa’s first solo show in London.

The talk will be by Dr Simon Baker, Curator of Photography and International Art at the Tate Gallery, and the artist of Over the Parched Field, Akiko Takizawa.

Akiko Takizawa

Akiko Takizawa was born in Fukuoka in 1971 and completed her MA in Printmaking at the Royal College of Art in 2006. Her interdisciplinary practices involve not only photography but filming and performing art. Her work was selected for Bloomberg New Contemporaries in 2006 and the exhibition toured from Liverpool to London. Her work was shortlisted for the Hitotsubo Award, one of the most prestigious photographic competitions in Japan. She was also awarded the University of Abertay Visual Arts Prize (2002), the Dundee Contemporary Arts Print Studio Residency Prize (2002), the London Print Studio Award (2002) and the Printmaking Today Award (2000).

Dr Simon Baker

Dr Simon Baker is Curator of Photography and International Art at Tate. He has researched, written and curated exhibitions on surrealism, photography, and contemporary art, including the recent Tate Modern exhibitions Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance and the Camera (2010), and Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters (2011). He is currently working on a major exhibition of the works of William Klein and Daido Moriyama for Tate Modern in October 2012.

Miró

Miró

Tate Modern 14 April  –  11 September 2011

About the exhibition

Joan Miró’s works come to London in the first major retrospective here for nearly 50 years. Renowned as one of the greatest Surrealist painters, filling his paintings with luxuriant colour, Miró worked in a rich variety of styles. This is a rare opportunity to enjoy more than 150 paintings, drawings, sculptures and prints from moments across the six decades of his extraordinary career.

Miró is among the most iconic of modern artists, using a language of symbols that reflects his personal vision, sense of freedom, and energy. The exhibition includes many of the key works that we know and love. It also shows that, behind the engaging innocence of his imagery, lies a profound concern for humanity and a sense of personal and national identity. Extraordinary works from different moments of his career celebrate his roots in his native Catalonia.

The exhibition also traces an anxious and politically engaged side to Miró’s work that reflects his passionate response to one of the most turbulent periods in European history. Working in Barcelona and Paris, Miró tracked the mood of the Spanish Civil War and the first months of the Second World War in France. Under the political restrictions of Franco’s Spain, Miró remained a symbol of international culture, and his grand abstract paintings of the late 1960s and early 1970s became a mark of resistance and integrity in the dying years of the regime. Telling the story of Miró’s life and the time he witnessed reveals a darker intensity to many of his works.

This is a must-see exhibition for 2011, filled with astonishing, beautiful and striking paintings by one of the greats of modern art.

See Miro for free and get fast track entry as a Member – join now!

Please note if the exhibition does get very busy Members may be asked to wait 5 or 10 minutes before entering.