Korean Culture Forum: A Bridge to the Future

Wednesday 30th Jan 2013, 5PM

Multi-purpose Hall, KCCUK

The Korean Cultural Centre UK is pleased to host a Forum on Korean Culturefeaturing four cultural experts. Each speaker will talk on their specialised cultural sector, the present and future of Korean culture’s presence in the UK and of course the possible future direction of the KCCUK itself.

 

*Guest Speakers and Abstract

The KCCUK – A look back at the first five years

Philip Gowman (Founder and Editor of London Korean Links)

Korean culture in London did not start with the opening of the Korean Cultural Centre (KCCUK) in 2008. But the establishment of a cultural venue at a high profile location with a regular government-funded budget has undoubtedly helped take the presentation of Korean culture in the UK to a new level. Full-time staff can obviously deliver projects that are beyond the reach of voluntary organisations. But going beyond the organisation of events – stressful enough in itself – the KCCUK has been able to build relationships with premier arts organisations in London such as the South Bank Centre and the Institute of Contemporary Arts which has enabled Korean cultural events to be presented at mainstream venues and thus reach a more generalist audience; and a flourishing relationship with London City Hall has enabled the Korean Village to become a central attraction of The Mayor’s Thames Festival. What is surprising though is that, contrary to some expectations, the entry of the Korean government into the promotion of Korean culture has not squeezed out private sector and individual initiatives. This talk will look back at the KCCUK’s achievements in its first five years and consider them alongside some of the complementary private sector projects during that period.

 

The Korean Wave in the British Context

Dr. Hyunsun Yoon (Ph.D. Cardiff University, Senior Lecturer in Advertising, School of Arts and Digital Industries, University of East London)

The flood of the Korean popular culture – films, pop music and especially TV dramas – into the rest of Asia around since the late 1990s became to be known as the Korean wave, and this has also been swiftly making its presence felt in other parts of the world such as Europe. This paper examines the ways in which the Korean wave has been, and is discussed in the mainstream media in the UK for the last decade. Considering the wide range of examples from Old Boy to Gangnam Style,this paper poses a question of whether or not the Korean wave found its way in seemingly impermeable British culture.

 

Korean Art:  Self Portrait

Jeremy Akerman (Artist and Curator, Co-director of Akermandaly.com)

Adopting the position of an observer I’d like to talk about my experience of art school and how I see art school in the UK working for a Korean art student. I will refer to the visits I’ve made to Korea as a tourist, curator and artist and why I find Korean people’s attitudes to Korea paradoxical and stimulating. Especially here I’d like to mention some Korean artists and an art collection that changed my mind about how I understood the country. A further point is to express the metaphor of self-portraiture within young Korean art and to suggest ways in which KCC can support and engage this vital new work.

 

Connecting UK & Korean Performing Arts

Sioned Hughes (Director, SRH Arts Management, specialises in international professional development of people across the arts and creative industries). 

 I will share the experience of a 2-year research exchange programme for Korean and UK performing arts managers that promoted and supported collaborative exchange between Korean and UK arts producers; developed performing arts professional networks between Korea and the UK and encouraged the development of artistic collaboration.

 

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Motto Yomu Chikara: Bridging the gap from GCSE to AS Level Japanese

13 July 2012 from 10.30am

he Japan Foundation, London

“Motto Yomu Chikara” is a brand new resource, funded by the Japan Foundation’sJapanese Language Local Project Support Programme. Designed to complement the Japan Foundation’s successful Chikara resources for GCSE Japanese, the trial version ofMotto Yomu Chikara consists of three units of reading texts and grammar exercises along with cultural information to help students bridge the gap between GCSE and AS level. The trial version of this resource has been completed and over 60 CDs have seen sent out to teachers of AS Japanese. The trial version can now also be downloaded here.

This workshop will open with an introduction to the Japan Foundation’s Chikara resource. The authors of Motto Yomu Chikara will then explain how this new resource works, and how to use it within the classroom. Finally, participants will have the opportunity to discuss how best to utilise Motto Yomu Chikara for effective teaching of GCSE and AS Level Japanese.

Speakers (authors of Motto Yomu Chikara):

  • Michiyo Kato Freelance Japanese Teacher
  • Shoko Middleton Japanese Teacher, Greenford High School
  • Sachiko Yamaguchi Japanese Teacher, King Edward VII School

For more information and an event schedule, please click here.

 Download MYCWorkshopFlyer


Developing Intercultural Competence through Language Education

30 June 2012 from 12.00am

Japan Foundation, London

Intercultural competence is embedded into most national language education curricula and into trans-national policies such as the CEFR. However, the role of teachers in facilitating the development of intercultural competence among their students is still evolving, with many areas for further research. In this seminar, we will examine some of the main frameworks of intercultural competence in language education and analyse their usefulness in language education. Next, we will look at links to the CEFR and will introduce the Autobiography of Intercultural Encounters, also produced by the Council of Europe. Finally, we will then hold a discussion on the ways in which teachers can incorporate intercultural learning into their own classroom practice within ever-present time and curriculum constraints.

Entry:     £3.00 for both BATJ members and non-members

 

Speakers:  Lynne Parmenter and Yuichi Tomita  Please note the seminar will be held partly in Japanese, and partly in English.

 

Entry:     £3.00 for both BATJ members and non-members
Speakers:  Lynne Parmenter and Yuichi Tomita
Please note the seminar will be held partly in Japanese, and partly in English.

For further information click here.

Double bill: You and Me(short) + Lost and Found

Korean Film Nights

7PM, May 24, 2012

Multi-Purpose Hall, KCCUK

Please note that the screening scheduled for the 17th has been added to the 24th’s programme.

U and Me (2008): weight lifter So-young is in third grade of junior high and she is in the same class as Cheol-gu, who is planning to move to Australia to study there. The two teens feel uncertain about the future that they’ve chosen, but their parents just force them to go on, regardless of how they feel.

Lost and Found (2009): This film follows a trip to Chuncheon. The college student believes that she will be filled with artistic inspiration when she sleeps with the famous artist. The painter is mad at the student yet he plays along with her due to sexual temptation. The film calls it ‘bad impulse. However, the bad impulse itself is not a bad thing. That same bad impulse sometimes leads a human into the temptation of art and sometimes provides the moment of truth in the throes of lust.

Deathbell

Deathbell (2008)

7pm, October 13, 2011

Yoon Hong-Seung

The film is set in a high school, where an elite group of twenty students—including rebellious heroine Kang Yi-na, her timid best friend Yoon Myong-hyo, and her would-be boyfriend Kang Hyeon—are taking a special class for their college entrance exam. After Kang Yi-na is nearly strangled and another student throttled in the restroom, the classroom TV screen switches to an image of top-ranking student Hye-yeong trapped inside a fish tank that is slowly filling with water. A disembodied voice announces that her life depends on the exam questions he will set for them, and that a student will die for every question the class gets wrong. Trapped with the students are head teacher Hwang Chan-wook and English teacher Choi So-yeong. Yi-na realizes that the students are being killed in order of their rank in the class, and she is ranked fifth. Someone is slowly killing the students one by one, but who are they? And what do they want?