Sa-kwa

Korean Film Nights

7pm February 28, 2013

Multi Purpose Hall

Sa-kwa

After seven years, Hyeon-jeong is dumped by Min-Seok. Broken and teetering on the brink of and emotional collapse she dedicates herself to finding a new suitor and to get married as soon as possible. She meets Sang-hoo, an awkward man, who Hyeon-jeong is attracted by his shy demeanour, and makes the conscious decision to marry him-until Min-Seok decides he’s made a mistake and wants to get back together with her.

Call Girls part 1

I recently read a book on Thai prostitutes and found their stories and views on their job very interesting.

Bee, 31 years old.

‘I was 25 years old. I was not a virgin. I was not stupid. In Thailand I made 8,000 baht a month working in a shopping mall. As a call girl (in England) I could make 8,000 baht a day. What would you do?’

It makes me wonder what people would do if they could get in a day what they make in a month. Would you work as prostitute? I doubt I would but I suppose in certain cases it could be the best option.

 

East-West encounters

Yesterday while I was reading a book I had bought few weeks ago I found few interesting paragraphs..

‘In sex, the comedy of misunderstanding between East and West is what arouses Wester men so much. But most fantasies are about strangers, not the people we live with. As tales, they are cruel, detached, anonymous; they revolve around submission, degradation, and symbolic rape.’……

‘Intentionally or otherwise, however, the East-West encounter is nearly always redeemed by being slightly comical, but it’s not a comedy which has any vicious intent. The Western man is not being mocked, nor is the Eastern woman. It is a difficult waltz to describe, but it could be called a quick, knowing dance of perfectly intentional ignorance. It’s a way of making sex innocent again’.

I’ve been thinking about my encounters with Eastern women…

I’m confused.

This Charming Girl

7pm, August 09, 2012

Multi-Purpose Hall, KCCUK

Jeong-hae (Kim Ji-soo) works at a postoffice. She lives near her workplace in a flat. In her secluded life only her plants and a cat she did pick up off the streets keep her company. She mainly eats instant noodles and oftentimes orders something out from the Home Shopping Channel’s commercials.
Except getting something to eat in her lunch break with her female colleagues, she avoids any contact to other people. Slowly, one gets to know a little bit more of her past, her dead mother and an old friend, who suddenly steps into her life again.
Jeong-hae did get some mental wounds in her past, but she decides to go on with life. When she often meets a writer (Hwang Jung-min) in the postoffice, she takes her chances and invites him for dinner. Can Jeong-hae really love again, despite her tragic past?

(English Subtitle)

10 Sinful Cities

According to Traveler’s Digest

10. Full Moon Parties, Koh Phangan Island,Thailand
Bungalows range from $2 to $20, but who wants to sleep when over 10,000 tourists flock to Haad Rin Beach, where drinks are free-pouring and DJs are spinning the best in hip-hop, techno, rap, and reggae. For show (i.e. when you are drunk and delirious by the beach), jugglers and fire-eaters entertain the crowd.

 9. Monaco
If you really want to live like a true player, then visit this grandiose and charming principality in Europe that many call the continent’s most fascinating vacation spot. Get ready to abuse the checkbook though. Did you really think royalty cuts corners?

 8. Ios, Greece
How could you omit the Greek Islands? Where generally sane, well-mannered folks congregate only to go crazy, get drunk, dance on tables and deprive themselves of sleep and all other things pure?

 7. Gold Cost, Australia
Surf’s up! Sex and alcohol blend in a wonderful orgy of vices. The Gold Coast also offers the tourists the first topless car wash alongside the Best Beauty Down Under Contest. Imagine that; beautiful girls put coins in parking meters so you can party more — it’s only fair at $13 a car wash.

 6. Goa, India (November and February)
New age enlightenment for the twenty-something crowd. Flights could fetch as much as $1000, but at $8 per room, you will have enough spending money to fly like a kite. A stay here will give new meaning to decadence. You thought Aerosmith was reckless in the 1970s? You ain’t seen nothing yet.

 5. Gatecrasher, England
Very few music festivals match the energy, adrenaline and debauchery levels shown in the Sheffield area Festival at the monstrous and epic Gatecrasher; where Trance meets Techno meets Electronica (meets sweat, drugs and alcohol). If you have ever had the fortune of visiting this event, you know what we’re talking about.

 4. Amsterdam, The Netherlands
You have to hand it to the Dutch. As hard as it might be to believe, some locals felt that the Red Light District was not organized or structured enough to greet the World’s Best. So lo and behold comes the annual Cannabis Cup in mid-November. For the recoveringtourists, visit the Seksmuseum.

 3. Las Vegas, Nevada
Okay, the original sin city has disrupted marriages before they even began, torn families apart, and probably ended a few lives ominously. What else could you possibly ask for? Oh and it’s also the setting of many a great movie about partying hardy.

 2. New Orleans, Louisiana
The city’s spicy food is great, its historic blues music is even better, its lax (more like nonexistent) drinking laws are a lifesaver as bars are open 24 hours a day. This sin city has rapidly dislodged and out-Vegased Las Vegas… no small feat. Of course, it helps to have a Mardi Gras, a.k.a show your boobs for my beads event in the streets.

 1. Pattaya, Thailand
Government officials refer to their city as the “Sexual Disneyland”; the mantra is “if you can suck it, use it, eat it, feel it, taste it or abuse it, Pattaya never sleeps and it is the best resort for you.” Three million visitors flock here every year to partake in casual sex and sexual freedom in the city’s 275 hotels and 35,000 rooms (which range between $10 to $80 a night).

A Sociology of Japanese Youth: From Returnees to NEETs

A Sociology of Japanese Youth: From Returnees to NEETs

27 February 2012

6:00 – 7:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Over the past thirty years, at the same time as Japan has produced a diverse set of youth cultures – such as animeand manga – which have had a major impact on popular culture across the globe, it has also developed a succession of youth problems which have led to major concerns within the country itself.

This volume looks at some of the best-known of these problems, from the concern over the so-called returnee children (kikokushijo) in the 1970s, to the panic over young girls selling themselves for sex (enjo kōsai) in the 1980s, to the debates over physical punishment (taibatsu) and child abuse (jidō gyakutai) in the 1990s, to the most recent issues of young people shutting themselves away in their room (hikikomori) or appearing to withdraw completely from both the education and the labour market (NEETs).

Drawing on detailed empirical fieldwork, the authors set these issues in a clearly articulated ‘social constructionist’ framework that explains why particular youth problems appeared when they did and what lessons they can provide for the study of youth problems in other societies.

Professor Roger Goodman

Professor Roger Goodman is Nissan Professor of Modern Japanese Studies and Head of the Social Science Division at the University of Oxford. His case studies in this volume draw on two of his monographs: Japan’s International Youth: The Emergence of a New Class of Schoolchildren (Oxford University Press, 1990) and Children of the Japanese State: The Changing Role of Child Protection Institutions in Contemporary Japan (Oxford University Press, 2000).

Yuki Imoto

Dr Yuki Imoto is Assistant Professor at Keio University, Japan, where she teaches English and social science methods. Her research interests lie in the social anthropology of education, language and childhood. She is currently writing a book on the emergence of ‘international’ preschools in urban Japan.

Tuukka Toivonen

Dr Tuukka Toivonen is Junior Research Fellow at Green Templeton College, University of Oxford. He currently investigates Japanese young workers’ motivational processes, social entrepreneurship and related policies from a comparative angle. Tuukka is the author of Japan’s Emerging Youth Policy(Routledge, forthcoming) and an active member of his college’s “Future of Work” programme.

BOOKING FORM