Support for the Arts in the UK and Japan

This seventh seminar in the 2011 series, Uncertain Futures: The Individual, Society and the State in the UK and Japan, will consider the issues surrounding support for the arts in the UK and Japan. In recent years, arts funding in both the UK and Japan has undergone severe cuts and dramatic changes. Colin Tweedy, Chief Executive of Arts & Business, and Mami Kataoka, Chief Curator of the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, will explore the current landscape and look to the future in assessing the impact of spending cuts and priorities for supporting the arts in these uncertain times.

Colin Tweedy

Colin Tweedy OBE is the Chief Executive of Arts & Business. He is also Chairman of CEREC (Comité Européen pour le Rapprochement de l’Economie et de la Culture). He is a Trustee of the Headlong Theatre, the Mariinsky Theatre Trust, the Serpentine Gallery and The Prince’s Foundation for Children & the Arts. Colin Tweedy is also a director of The Ideas Foundation, a Council member of the National Musicians Symphony Orchestra and a Governor of the University for the Creative Arts. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA). In 2000 he received an OBE for services to business partnerships with the arts in The Queen’s Birthday Honours.

Mami Kataoka

Mami Kataoka has been the Chief Curator at the Mori Art Museum (MAM) in Tokyo since 2003. She is currently overseeing many international projects, including the 9th Gwangju Biennale 2012 in South Korea as the Joint Artistic Director, and Phantoms of Asia at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco as guest curator. She was the International Curator at the Hayward Gallery in London between 2007 and 2009, curated Laughing in the Foreign Language(2008) and co-curated Walking in My Mind (2009). Kataoka frequently writes and gives lectures on contemporary art in Asia.

Jenny White (Chair)

Jenny White has 25 years’ experience of producing arts projects in UK, Latin America, East Asia and Japan. After working as manager of Scotland’s Communicado Theatre, she first encountered the British Council, and worked with them, initially in Japan for ten years, introducing contemporary British artists and programming two UK-Japan festivals UK90 and UK98, and then in Thailand and in London, as Head of Arts Development. From 2006-2009, she was Director of the British Council in Cuba, hosting the visit of the Royal Ballet and producing UK’s contribution to the Latin American Film Festival and the Habana Biennial of Art. She is currently on assignment to manage the Environmental impact of British Council’s global cultural relations work. With a lifelong interest in Japan and the intersection between Japanese and British cultures, Jenny will draw on her experience to contribute to this topical debate for both the UK and Japan.

19 October 2011

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japanese House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

BOOKING FORM

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From Philanthropy to Essential Business Investment – the evolution of CSR in the UK

19 July 2011 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London
Russell Square House, 10-12 Russell Square
London WC1B 5EH

This seminar will introduce the background to Corporate Social Responsibility in the UK and, through the story of one of this country’s most famous companies, explain why and how corporate good practice has changed from being a reactive response into a strategic investment for sustainable business success. The speakers will first look back at the origins of CSR and question the extent to which, in its current form, it can genuinely help companies, across the board, realise their corporate strategic objectives. This seminar is the inaugral event in a new series which will inform Japanese and other interested corporate sector professionals and researchers about recent CSR thinking and trends in the UK.

Ian Blythe is a former Pollution Control Officer for Severn Trent Water, who joined Boots in 1990. His experience has been used in developing Boots UK’s approach to broader CSR strategy and reporting and he has been a key contributor to developing an international approach to CSR across the Alliance Boots Group. Ian represents the Boots UK business on various national and local committess, including the All-Party Parliamentary Environment Group, British Retail Consortium’s Environment Policy Advisory Group, CBI Environmental Affairs Committee, and Business in the Community’s East Midlands Advisory Board.

Takeshi Shimotaya is a founder and Managing Director of Sustainavision Ltd. Sustainavision Ltd aims to contribute to the development of a sustainable society through supporting company’s CSR strategy. It proposes to achieve this through reviewing and, where necessary, improving CSR programmes, Carbon Management programmes, and undertaking tailor-made CSR related research and CSR related workshops. Prior to founding Sustainavision Ltd, Takeshi worked for well-known industrial companies, such as Kawasaki Heavy Industries and Eco Mining, gaining valuable experience in CSR and the renewable energy field.

Booking: This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please email your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.

Healthcare Provision and Management in the UK and Japan

Seminar details:

14 June 2011

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Uncertain Futures: The Individual, Society and the State in the UK and Japan, will consider the issues surrounding healthcare provision and management in the UK and Japan. This is a highly topical area for debate in the UK as spending cuts and healthcare reforms focus attention on the ways in which the NHS must adapt to changing times. The Japanese health service is facing similar difficulties as Japan’s ageing population and low birth rate impact upon healthcare needs and provision. Our speakers bring both academic and professional perspectives to bear on this comparative discussion of the economics and social dynamics of healthcare provision.

Professor Kiyoshi Morita

Kiyoshi Morita is Director of Okayama University Hospital. He has also been Head of Okayama University since December, 2010. Since graduating the University Medical School with MD in 1974 he has been specializing in anaesthesiology in many hospitals in the South part of Japan. From 1978 to1980 he was Fellow of Anaesthesiology of Albert Einstein Medical College, Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center, New York, USA. In 1984 he started teaching at Okayama University while practicing at the hospital. He is Professor at Department of Anaesthesiology and Resuscitology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences. In 2004-2009 He was a Board of Directors, The Japanese Society on Intensive Care Medicine. Since 2009 he is President of the Japanese Society of Anaesthesiologists.

Professor Gwyn Bevan

Gwyn Bevan is Professor of Management Science in Department of Management Research at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has worked as an academic at Warwick Business School and in Medical Schools in London and Bristol. He has also worked in industry, consulting, the Treasury, and for the Commission for Health Improvement (CHI). His current research includes studies of outcomes of the natural experiment of different policies in UK countries for the NHS and schools following devolution; and the SyMPOSE (Systems Modelling for Performance Optimisation and Service Equity) project funded by the Health Foundation, which is a programme of collaborative research that aims to reduce expenditure on health care with least harm to the health of populations and without widening inequalities in health.

Dr Jonathan Batchelor

Jonathan Batchelor is a consultant dermatologist at Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust and researcher at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology at the University of Nottingham. His research interests include the methodology and reporting of dermatology clinical trials, and the application of the principle of evidence-based medicine to in the field of clinical dermatology. He is currently involved in developing feasibility work for clinical trial of treatments for vitiligo and is on the steering committee for the Eczema Priority Setting Partnership which, in conjunction with the James Lind Alliance, seeks to involve both clinicians and patients in the process of identifying future research priorities in the field of eczema treatments. Dr Batchelor was a Daiwa Scholar in 2001-3, spending a year at the National Centre for Child Health and Development, where he undertook research on patients’ ability to assess the reliability of health information. He was also a visiting doctor at the Showa University Department of Dermatology.

BOOKING FORM

The Future of Education in the UK and Japan

This fourth seminar in the 2011 series, Uncertain Futures: The Individual, Society and the State in the UK and Japan, will consider the role of education in society and the pressures of adapting education policy to changing needs. The ebb and flow of educational reforms in past decades has seen British and Japanese models held up for scrutiny or emulation. Individualism, internationalization and the information age have, at different times, informed debates on ideology and practice. Our speakers will explore such topics as ‘the tyranny of exams’ and education for employability in determining to what extent economic necessity may determine the priorities of the future. The discussion will focus upon core values in education and aspirations for children, families and schools in the UK and Japan.

Contributors

Dr Anthony Seldon

Anthony Seldon is a political historian and commentator on British political leadership as well as on education and contemporary Britain. He is also Master of Wellington College, one of Britain’s most famous and historic independent schools and was co-founder and first Director of the Institute of Contemporary British History. Dr Seldon is author or editor of some 25 books, including Brown at 10, a biography of Gordon Brown (2010), ‘Trust: How We Lost It and How to Get It Back’ (2009), ‘Blair’s Britain, 1994-2007’ and ‘Blair Unbound, 2001-2007’ (with Peter Snowdon)(2007). He has honorary doctorates from the Universities of Brighton and Richmond and in 2007 was given a Chair at the College of Teachers as Professor of Education. He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Society of Arts. Dr Seldon is regarded as one of the country’s most high profile independent school headmasters and appears regularly on television and radio and in the press, and writes for several national newspapers. His views on education have regularly been sought by both government and political parties.

Professor Roger Goodman

Roger Goodman is Nissan Professor of Modern Japanese Studies at the University of Oxford where he has been Head of the Social Sciences Division since 2008. His publications include ‘Japan’s International Youth: The Emergence of a New Class of Schoolchildren’ (1990) and ‘Children of the Japanese State: The Changing Role of Child Protection Institutions in Contemporary Japan’ (2000) both of which have also been published in Japanese versions. He has also edited or co-edited a further eleven books including ‘The East Asian Welfare Model: Welfare Orientalism and the State’ (1998); ‘Family and Social Policy in Japan’ (2002); ‘Can the Japanese Change their Education System?’ (2002); ‘Global Japan: The Experience of Japan’s New Immigrant and Overseas Communities’ (2003), ‘The ‘Big Bang’ in Japanese Higher Education: The 2004 Reforms and the Dynamics of Change’ (2005), ‘Ageing in Asia: Asia’s Position in the New Global Demography’ (2007) and ‘A Sociology of Japanese Youth Problems: From Returnees to NEETs’ (forthcoming, 2011). His main research interests are in the education and social welfare systems of modern Japan.

Baroness Estelle Morris (Chair)

The Baroness Morris of Yardley started her career in education as a teacher in an inner city multi-racial comprehensive school where she taught for 18 years. In 1992 she entered Parliament and in 2001 became the Secretary of State for Education and Skills. She followed this with 2 years as a Minister at the Department of Culture Media and Sport and left Parliament in 2005. Since then she has combined a career that includes senior posts both in education and the arts as well as being a member of the House of Lords. Her roles in education have allowed her to see the education landscape from classroom teacher to senior policy maker and it is this breadth of experience that is now reflected in her comments and analysis of education. Amongst other posts she now works at the Institute of Effective Education at the University of York which aims to transform the relationship between education research and practice so that policy making and teaching can become more evidence based. She is a regular contributor to Guardian Education.

24 May 2011

6:00 – 7:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

BOOKING FORM


Countermeasures for the Great East Japan Earthquake

This event seems to be very relevant for those worried about the situation in Japan.


Detailed information and registration form here.

Thursday, 21st April 2011 13.30-15.00

Venue Address:
JETRO London
MidCity Place 71, High Holborn London WC1V 6AL
Tel: 020-7421-8300, FAX : 020-7421-0009
Website: http://www.jetro.go.jp/uk/contact/

To apply, please fax a registration form to JETRO London by 19th April.
Capacity is 100 people, and places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

In further detail, an explanation will be made on the current situation in Japan regarding nuclear reactors, radiation levels in and around the major cities, regulations surrounding food products and tap water, regulation on exports, and the conditions of Japanese harbours and airports. The speakers will in turn explain the countermeasures that are being, and will be taken in response to the damages caused by the disaster.

Rethinking Mrs Watanabe

Japan Foundation Fellows Lecture Series III:
Rethinking Mrs Watanabe – changes and constraints in the relationship between Japanese women and accounting/finance under the influence of globalisation
by Dr Naoko Komori

Japanese women have long held the purse strings when it comes to household finance. The skills and activities of Japanese housewives have been attracting attention in the UK since the late 2000s, when the media dubbed them “kimono traders”. This seminar examines how the role played by Japanese women in accounting and finance is evolving as part of the reconfiguration of accountancy and finance happening under globalisation.

This seminar considers the relationship between Japanese women and accounting/finance: how women’s financial role has been shaped historically; the significance of their role in Japanese business and society; and how their relationship with accounting has changed under the influence of globalisation. It also discusses the difficulties involved in acquiring an accurate understanding and knowledge of Japan from outside the country.

10 March 2011 from 6:30 pm

The Japan Foundation, London

10-12 Russell Square

WC1B 5EH