Sumidagawa and Curlew River: Britten’s Encounter with Noh

6 September 2012

6:00 – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:15pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan’s leading specialist music and arts college, is staging back-to-back performances of the Noh play Sumidagawa and Benjamin Britten’s opera Curlew River, in London and Suffolk on 7 and 9 September (sumidagawa-curlewriver.com). Curlew River is closely based on Sumidagawa, which Britten saw twice when he visited Japan in 1953. In advance of these performances, this event aims to help audiences understand both pieces and put them into context. How does Sumidagawa fit into the Noh tradition? Why did this ancient Japanese art have such a powerful impact on Britten? And how did he digest his Japanese experiences as he produced Curlew River, shifting the locale from Tokyo’s Sumida River to the marshy landscapes of East Anglia, transforming the “capital birds” of the original into curlews, and replacing Buddhism with medieval Christianity? Whether you are able to attend the performances or not, the encounter between one of Japan’s most sophisticated art forms and the UK’s greatest 20th century composer is a fascinating story.

Professor Tomotaka Sekine

Professor Tomotaka Sekine began his stage career at the age of four playing the child parts in Kurama Tengu and Hibariyama, and gave his first shiteperformance in Tsunemasa in 1963. After graduating from Tokyo University of the Arts, he became a pupil of the 25th Kanze Soke Motomasa Sakon. Becoming independent in 1981, he gave performances ofShakkoMidare and Dojoji. Performing as a member of Kenkyu-Kai, Kanno-Kai and Mori-no-Kai, his Noh repertoire included OkinaKinutaMochizukiand Sotoba Komachi. He joined Tokyo University of the Arts as an associate professor in 2004, becoming a professor in 2010 (Department of Traditional Japanese Music, Kanze ’school of Noh’). In the university’s “Beauty of Traditional Japanese Music” programme, he collaborated with other art fields in presenting Konjaku Monogatari. He was certified Intangible Cultural Property, is a board member of the Kanze Association, a member of Kenkyu-Kai, and the chairman of Kangetsu-Kai.

Dr Daisaku Mukai

Dr Daisaku Mukai is a lecturer in musicology at Ueno Gakuen University, Tokyo. He has also been a research fellow at the Research Centre of the Graduate School of Music, Tokyo University of the Arts since 2009. His specialities are 20th century music and music aesthetics. He completed his PhD on Britten at Tokyo University of the Arts in 2008. In his dissertation entitled “Dramaturgy of invisible sounds in Benjamin Britten’s opera”, he analyses Britten’s musical dramaturgy, focusing on his leitmotiftechnique and the function of invisible sounds in his operatic works. He is now working on the study ofCurlew River and Britten’s relationship with Japan.

BOOKING FORM

Light Up London

19th August 2012

Action for Japan UK is going to screen the documentary, ‘LIGHT UP NIPPON.’ This is a documentary about the firework performance that was held along the coast of Japan last year in order to commemorate the victims of the Great East Earthquake, and to provide aid for the affected people.

Entrance Fee
£10 (early bird TICKETS:)

£15 (at the door)

All proceeds go to LIGHT UP NIPPON and Action for Japan UK.

On March 11th, 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake happened. In the face of a perceived unprecedented disaster and the massive casualties, everyone across Japan was bending their head down, wondering how Japan can be reconstructed. However, there was a man who kept looking up. He came up with the idea of a firework performance at the ten affected areas across the coast of East Japan. Although this performance was thought to be impossible to happen, it was the passion of one person and the local people’s zest for living that made this idea come true.
Narration: Hitomi Kuroki, Music: Ryuichi Sakamoto, Co-making: the Japan Foundation.

For more information, please visit http://lightupnippon.jp/en/.

Action for Japan UK (http://actionforjapan-uk.net/)

Action for Japan UK is an organisation comprised of undergraduate and postgraduate students in the UK who want to help people affected by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

Japanese from Scratch

 

29 August 2012 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London

Japanese from Scratch is a new series of Japanese language and culture workshops from the Japan Foundation London, suitable for those who are interested in learning Japanese but haven’t started yet, or those who have just started learning.

:: This evening’s theme: Travel in Japan

Learn how to make the most of your experience in Japan,including:

– Professional advice & tips for travellers
– Essential Japanese language, including greetings, dining and etiquette
– Access to information from travel companies

Date & Time: August 29th 2012, 18:30 – 21:00 (Registration from 18:00)

This workshop is for those intersted in travelling to Japan, Japanese culture or learning Japanese. Instructions and explanations will be in English.

:: Speakers

Yumi Takakubo  Trade Partnerships & Marketing Manager
Japan National Tourism Organisation (JNTO)

Seiji Fukushima  Chief Japanese Language Advisor
Japan Foundation London

:: Fee and Booking

Fee: Only £5.00 – Includes Japanese food and drink taster, and a small Japanese gift. The fee must be paid in cash only on arrival. We cannot accept cheques or credit cards.

Booking: Please click here to book online
*The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation.

Advance booking is essential. This workshop is limited to 100 – strictly first come, first served.

This is event is co-organised by the Japan Foundation London and the Japan National Tourism Organisation (JNTO).

*The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation.The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation.
*The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation.The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation

 

 

Leadership and Corporate Life

12 July 2012

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

With the global economy in the doldrums, companies everywhere face difficult challenges. Japanese corporate leaders have two decades of experience with a sluggish economy, and may be able to offer lessons for their UK counterparts about how to respond to the current difficult environment. British companies are being urged by the government to export more, particularly to the Far East, echoing Japan’s experience, that exports have indeed been a relative bright spot in recent years. But the Japanese corporate sector isn’t in great shape either. Iconic exporters like Sony are struggling to compete with Asian and American rivals, while the Olympus scandal has reminded us that Japan still has deep-rooted governance and audit problems.

So what should corporate leaders in both countries have uppermost in their minds? Our two speakers are well-placed to comment. As well as being former Chairman of Airbus Japan, Glen Fukushima is well-known as a commentator on a wide range of issues relevant to the Japanese corporate sector – from trade policy to the educational system. Stuart Lyons, meanwhile, has broad experience of the UK corporate sector. He was formerly CEO of Royal Doulton (for whom Japan is an important market), and is currently Chairman of furniture manufacturer Airsprung Furniture group. This is the fifth seminar in our 2012 series Leadership: People and Power in the UK and Japan.

 

Glen S. Fukushima

Glen S. Fukushima was President and CEO (2005 – 2010) and Chairman and Director (2010 – 2012) of Airbus Japan. He has worked in Japan since 1990 as a senior executive in four US multinationals and served as Vice President and President of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan. He has served on numerous Japanese, American, and European corporate boards and advisory councils and is a Trustee of Keizai Doyukai (Japan Association of Corporate Executives). From 1985 to 1990, he worked in Washington DC as Director for Japanese Affairs and as Deputy Assistant USTR for Japan and China at the Office of the United States Trade Representative. His book The Politics of US-Japan Trade Conflict (in Japanese) was awarded the Masayoshi Ohira Prize in 1993. He was educated at Stanford (BA), Harvard (MA, JD), Keio (Stanford-Keio Exchange Scholar), and Tokyo (Fulbright and Japan Foundation Fellow).

Stuart Lyons

Stuart Lyons is Chairman of Airsprung Group PLC, the furniture and mattress manufacturer. After graduating in Classics from King’s College, Cambridge, he joined the retail and clothing group United Drapery Stores, where he rose to be managing director. Following a takeover, he became chief executive of Royal Doulton, where he led both the business itself and the industry confederation, receiving a CBE for services to the china industry. He has been a member of the Ordnance Survey Review Committee, the Monopolies & Mergers Commission, and the Council of Keele University, a governor of Staffordshire University and Chairman of the West Midlands Development Agency. More recently, he assisted the Conservative opposition as a chief policy advisor and authored three influential publications for the Centre for Policy Studies, Can Consignia Deliver?, A Department for Business and Harnessing our Genius.

Dr Simon Learmount (Chair)

Dr Simon Learmount is University Lecturer in Corporate Governance at the University of Cambridge. He has recently been awarded the University’s Pilkington Prize, which recognises excellence in teaching. Prior to joining the University of Cambridge, Dr Learmount was founder and Managing Director of Saxoncourt Ltd, Director of Sales and Marketing at International Packaging Ltd and Shimomura Fellow at the Development Bank of Japan. His main teaching and research interests lie in the areas of international corporate governance reform and management practice; currently he is particularly interested in the training and development of senior executives and company directors. He has consulted to a number of organisations around the world, including the Tokyo Stock Exchange, BT, Rolls Royce, Coca Cola, BP, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, Agricultural Bank of China and Roche. He has lived and worked in Japan, the US, France and Spain.

Hedge Fund Activism in Japan: The Limits of Shareholder Primacy

5 July 2012

6:00 – 7:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Hedge fund activism is an expression of shareholder primacy, an idea that has come to dominate discussion of corporate governance theory and practice worldwide over the past two decades. This book provides a thorough examination of public and often confrontational hedge fund activism in Japan in the period between 2001 and the full onset of the global financial crisis in 2008. In Japan this shareholder-centric conception of the company espoused by activist hedge funds clashed with the alternative Japanese conception of the company as an enduring organisation or a ‘community’. By analysing this clash, the book derives a fresh view of the practices underpinning corporate governance in Japan and offers suggestions regarding the validity of the shareholder primacy ideas currently at the heart of US and UK beliefs about the purpose of the firm.

Dr John Buchanan

Dr John Buchanan is a research associate at the Centre for Business Research, Judge Business School, University of Cambridge. His first degree was in oriental studies and subsequently he worked as a commercial banker in Brazil, Japan and Spain, and then as an investment banker in the UK and Japan, at both British and Japanese banks. He has been studying Japanese corporate governance since 2002.

Professor Simon Deakin

Professor Simon Deakin is Professor of Law in the Faculty of Law and Fellow of Peterhouse at the University of Cambridge. He has directed an interdisciplinary programme of research on corporate governance at the Centre for Business Research in Cambridge since the early 1990s. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2005.

The book will be available on the day at the discounted price of £48.

BOOKING FORM

After the Disaster: Returning to Normal Life and Play in Tohoku

28 June 2012

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Much western attention on Japan since 11 March 2011 has focused either on the implications of the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, or on the recovery of the nation’s economy. While these issues remain of great importance, it seems that the effects of the tsunami on the lives of ordinary citizens in the affected regions are beginning to fade into the background, as the world turns its attention elsewhere. Moreover, due to the large proportion of older people in the population, and the disproportionate effects of the tsunami on them, the impacts of the disaster on children and how they are able to return to normality have sometimes been overlooked. In this seminar, Peter Matanle will look at plans for the reconstruction of the tsunami affected areas and assess progress achieved thus far, and then Helen Woolley will focus in detail on how the tsunami has affected children’s play. In particular, she will show the current state of where children used to play in the outdoors, explain the context of children’s outdoor play in temporary housing areas and begin to address some issues for the future as local citizens try to put the disaster behind them, put their lives back together, and re-establish a normal life for their children once more.

Dr Peter Matanle

Dr Peter Matanle is Lecturer in Japanese studies at the National Institute of Japanese Studies and School of East Asian Studies, University of Sheffield. His research is in the social and cultural geography of Japan, and the role of employment systems in Japan’s developmental and post-developmental processes. He has published four books and various peer reviewed articles and book chapters in these fields including, Japan’s Shrinking Regions in the 21st Century: Contemporary Responses to Depopulation and Socioeconomic Decline (co-authored with Anthony S. Rausch and the Shrinking Regions Research Group, Cambria Press, 2011), and ‘The Great East Japan Earthquake, Tsunami, and Nuclear Meltdown: Towards the (Re)construction of a safe, sustainable and compassionate society in Japan’s shrinking regions’ (Local Environment, 16 (9): 843-847).

Helen Woolley

Helen Woolley is a Chartered Landscape Architect and Reader in Landscape Architecture and Society in the Department of Landscape at the University of Sheffield. Helen’s research is about issues of open space and people. This has related to, and informed, national policy and strategic issues about green and open space with an increasing focus on green space and housing in recent years. She is also an expert on inclusive outdoor environments with a particular interest in children and open spaces. Helen has a strong record of knowledge transfer and consultancy activities working with a wide range of partners including some in the built environment, play and housing sectors. These research and knowledge transfer activities have been funded by research councils, government departments, national organisations and charities. In April Helen visited the Tohoku area of Japan with a colleague from Chiba University to begin to understand the situation of children’s outdoor environments in the post disaster area.

Dr Christopher P. Hood (chair)

Dr Christopher P. Hood is a Reader in Japanese Studies at Cardiff University. His latest book Dealing with Disaster in Japan: Responses to the Flight JL123 Crash (Routledge, 2011) is about responses to the world’s largest single plane crash which occurred in Japan in 1985. The book covers a variety of issues, including how the state reacted and the way those who lost loved ones have responded over the years. A chapter related to this work appears in Death and Dying in Contemporary Japan (Routledge, 2012) edited by Hikaru Suzuki. He was a part of the ‘Shrinking Regions Research Group’, whose research was edited by Peter Matanle and Anthony Rausch into Japan’s Shrinking Regions in the 21st Century(Cambria Press, 2011). Other publications include:Shinkansen: From Bullet Train to Symbol of Modern Japan (Routledge, 2006), Japanese Education Reform: Nakasone’s Legacy (Routledge, 2001), andThe Politics of Modern Japan (4 volumes) (editor, Routledge, 2008).

BOOKING FORM

Informal Social Infrastructures: Living in Sendai

25 June 2012

6:00 – 7:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Professor Hitoshi Abe will give a talk entitled “Living in Sendai” in which he will introduce an overview of what has been happening in Tohoku since the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011, illustrating a series of specific projects and responses initiated by various architects and organizations. Professor Abe is the founder ofArchi+AID, which is a network to support the relief and recovery projects made by architects for the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. This talk will propose a forum to re-think the role of architects with regards to the reconstruction of social spaces in the ever-increasing complexities of cities with the need of informal infrastructure. The talk will be chaired by Shin Egashira, Diploma School Unit Master and Visiting School Course Director at the Architectural Association.

This talk is linked to the exhibition at the Embassy of Japan in London, YATAI HERE YATAI THERE, which is on display from 18 June – 13 July as a part of the International Architecture Showcase at the London Festival of Architecture. The theme of the 2012 London Festival of Architecture is “The Playful City”.  For more information, please visit: www.lfa2012.org.

This talk is supported by the Embassy of Japan and organised in association with the Architectural Association School of Architecture.

Professor Hitoshi Abe

Professor Hitoshi Abe is Chair of Architecture & Urban Design at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Abe earned his M.Arch. from SCI-ARC in Los Angeles in 1988 and his PhD from Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan, in 1993. In 2007, he was appointed professor and chair of the UCLA Department of Architecture and Urban Design. In 2010, he was appointed Paul I. and Hisako Terasaki Chair in the Study of Contemporary Japan as well as Director of the UCLA Paul I. and Hisako Terasaki Center for Japanese Studies. Abe is the subject of the Phaidon Press monograph Hitoshi Abe by Naomi Pollock published in 2009. He has a decade-long distinguished career as a leader in education. Since 1992, when Professor Abe won first prize in the Miyagi Stadium competition, he has maintained an active international design practice based in Sendai, Japan, and Los Angeles as well as a schedule of lecturing and publishing, which place him among the leaders in his field.

Shin Egashira (Chair)

Shin Egashira makes art and architecture worldwide. His recent collaborative experiments include “How to Walk a Flat Elephant” and “Twisting Concrete”, which aim to fuse old and new technologies, such as concrete, digital images and physical computing. Egashira has been conducting a series of landscape workshops in rural communities across the world, including Koshirakura (Japan), Gu-Zhu Village (China) and Muxagata (Portugal). He has been teaching at the Architectural Association since 1990 and is currently the Unit Master of Diploma Unit 11.

Russia, China and Global Governance

21 June 2012

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

With the rise of non-Western nations in the new world order, the need for international cooperation and global governance on economic, financial and security issues has never been greater.  But the emerging multipolar order does not seem to have contributed to global stability so far. The US, the EU and Japan are working to persuade the BRICS to take multilateral institutions more seriously, though the US itself often seems ambivalent about multilateralism. Most European governments know that they have a big interest in effective multilateral institutions. The behaviour of Russia and China – both veto-wielding permanent members of the UN Security Council – is particularly crucial in dealing with global challenges, including climate change and peace-keeping operations.  What is Japan’s role within global institutions such as the G20, the WTO and the UN? Can the EU and Japan help nudge Russia and China towards a more serious engagement with global governance issues? Japan is in a difficult position in this respect, since Russia and China are its immediate neighbours and it has complex issues with both countries. But this makes it all the more important for Japan that both countries become responsible members of multinational institutions, and respect global governance. Our three speakers will discuss Russia, China and global governance issues from their own varying perspectives.

Charles Grant

Charles Grant is Director of the Centre of European Reform (CER). He studied Modern History at Cambridge University and joined The Economist in 1986 where he wrote about the City. He was posted to Brussels in 1989 to cover the European Community, before becoming the Defence Editor in London from 1993. He left The Economist to become the first Director of the CER in 1998. He was a Director and Trustee of the British Council from 2002 to 2008, and is a regular contributor to the Financial Timesand The Guardian, amongst other publications. He has authored many CER publications. These includeCan Europe and China shape a new world order?(2008), Cameron’s Europe: can the Conservatives achieve their EU objectives? (2009), and Russia, China and Global Governance (2012).

Akira Imamura

Akira Imamura is Minister and Consul General at the Embassy of Japan in the UK. He was stationed in Moscow three times between the 1980s and 2000s. After graduating from Tokyo University in 1984, he served for the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He has served as Director, Russia Assistance Division (2002), and Director, Central and South Eastern Europe Division (2003), in Tokyo. During his last stay in Moscow, he gave numerous interviews to the Russian media on various themes including territorial issues and the nuclear accident in Fukushima. He has co-authored a book: The Atlas Book of Russia and CIS Countries (Diamond, Inc., 1993).

Professor Urs Matthias Zachmann

Professor Urs Matthias Zachmann is the Handa Professor of Japanese-Chinese Relations at the University of Edinburgh. He graduated from Heidelberg University (MA, PhD) and completed his Habilitation in Japanese Studies at the University of Munich. He is also qualified as an attorney at law in Germany and is a member of the bar. His fields of specialization are Japan’s international relations (with a special focus on China), law and legal sociology in East Asia, and the political and intellectual history of modern Japan. Among his most recent publications are: China and Japan in the Late Meiji Period: China Policy and the Japanese Discourse on National Identity, 1895-1904(Routledge, 2009/11) and International Law in Japan: War and Visions of International Order in the International Legal Discourse of Japan, 1919-1960 (Nomos, 2012).

Gideon Rachman (Chair)

Gideon Rachman became chief foreign affairs columnist for the Financial Times in July 2006. He joined the Financial Times after a 15-year career atThe Economist, which included spells as a foreign correspondent in Brussels, Washington and Bangkok. He also edited The Economist’s business and Asia sections. His particular interests include American foreign policy, the European Union and globalisation. He was named foreign commentator of the year in Britain’s annual Comment Awards in 2010. His first book, Zero-sum World: Politics, Power and Prosperity After the Crash (Atlantic Books) was published in 2010.

BOOKING FORM

Yukio Suzuki in Conversation

18 June 2012 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London

 Yukio Suzuki is a visionary choreographer and dancer whose captivating style of contemporary dance has earned him numerous awards and established him as one of the most talked-about dancers in Japan today.Originally trained in the Japanese performance art butoh at the Asbestos-kan (Asbestos House) in Tokyo, a dance studio founded by Tatsumi Hijikata, Suzuki both choreographs and performs an iconic style of contemporary dance as part of his own company Kingyo. His productions are actualised through his highly trained body with a strong influence from butoh, ballet and theatre, and recently are fused with cutting-edge lighting technology, pushing towards a new realm of contemporary dance.

In conversation with John Ashford, Director of Aerowaves, Suzuki will talk about in an illustrative way his distinguishing career development and achievements. Showcasing some of his astonishing previous works including his most recent performance etude, which was performed as part of the Jurassic Coast Earth Festival as part of the ambitious Creative Coast 2012 project, they will explore how Suzuki has adapted his diverse influences to evolve his contemporary dance spectacle. He will also discuss the current climate of contemporary dance in Japan, and suggest the future it may hold.

This event is free but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please contact event@jpf.org.uk with your name, details and those of any guests.

International Symposium: Climate Change and Energy Policy in a Post-Fukushima World – What does the future hold?

Date: 23 May 2012
Registration and Networking: 4.00-4.30pm
Symposium: 4.30-6.30pm
Location: DLA Piper LLP, 1 St. Paul’s Place, Sheffield S1 2JX
Attendance by ticket only. Please see below.

The March 2011 disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant exposes enduring questions about the safety and reliability of nuclear energy, the capabilities of human beings to predict and manage complex events, and the relationship between humanity and nature. The international response to the disaster has been varied; the UK position on nuclear power remains virtually unchanged, while Germany has vowed to phase out nuclear generation altogether by 2022. Japanese official policy is unlikely to phase out nuclear power entirely, but a de facto phase out appears possible.

Nuclear energy has been regarded as a failsafe method of reducing human dependence on fossil fuels and mitigating the worst impacts of climate change. What does the future hold for nuclear power in the wake of the Fukushima disaster, and what impacts will there be on plans to reduce carbon emissions and combat climate change?

Demand for places is likely to exceed supply, so attendance at this event is by ticket only.Applications for attendance must be made through the following online booking form:
https://www.eventelephant.com/postfukushima/summary.htm. Non-attendance will be charged at £15 per ticket. Event queries: events@actionforinvolvement.org.uk, Tel: 07946 453 258.

Speakers:

Dr Wakako Hironaka

Dr Wakako Hironaka is a former Member of the House of Councillors (1986-2010) and a former Vice-Chair of the Democratic Party of Japan. Among her many roles, she has served as State Minister, Director-General of the Environment Agency (1993-94), Chair of the Committee on Fundamental National Policies, and Chair of the EU-Japan Parliamentary Group. Dr Hironaka has also been active internationally, as a Vice-Chair of Global Environmental Action, Chair of GLOBE Japan, and member of the World Commission on Forests and Sustainable Development, the Earth Charter Initiative, and International Science Advisory Board of UNESCO. She currently serves as Director-General of GEA, and as a Board Member of the Energy and Resources Institute, Earth Charter Commission and PA International Foundation. She was awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun by the Emperor Akihito in 2010.

Councillor Jillian Creasy

Councillor Jillian Creasy was elected as Sheffield’s first Green Party City Councillor in 2004 and now leads the Green Group on the council. She still works part time as a medical doctor (General Practitioner). She makes the links between social and environmental sustainability philosophically, politically and personally.

Jun Arima

Jun Arima is Director General of the Japan External Trade Organisation (JETRO) in London, seconded by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). From 1992 he had served in the Agency for Natural Resources and Energy (ANRE). In 1996, he was sent to the OECD as Councilor (energy advisor), to the Permanent Delegation of Japan. He served in senior positions in ANRE following his return to Japan. In 2002 he was sent to Paris and spent four years there as Head of the Country Studies Division for the International Energy Agency (IEA). His activities in international climate and energy issues have seen Arima recognised internationally, most recently as Japan’s chief negotiator at the UN Climate Talks in Cancun, Mexico in 2010.

Professor Neil Hyatt

Professor Neil Hyatt holds the Royal Academy of Engineering Research Chair in Radioactive Waste Management at the University of Sheffield. His current research programme involves: design and process engineering for the immobilisation of radioactive wastes, the behaviour of wasteform materials in conceptual disposal environments, and remediation of contaminated land. He is the author or co-author of more than 100 peer reviewed articles.

Shinichi Kihara

Shinichi Kihara has been Senior Energy Analyst at the International Energy Agency in Paris since 2009. He contributed to the in-depth analysis of nuclear power in the World Energy Outlook 2011. He previously served in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), carrying out energy related work in the International Affairs Division of the Agency for Natural Resources in 2004 and Nuclear Power Safety Administration Division in 1998. He has diverse experience serving in other offices in the METI in the area of economic cooperation, trade, export control and others.

Teresa Hitchcock

Teresa Hitchcock is Senior Partner and UK head of Safety Health and Environment (SHE) within the Regulatory and Government Affairs group of international law firm DLA Piper. Before qualifying as a solicitor, she worked as a senior environmental and health and safety regulator in local government. Based in DLA Piper’s Sheffield office, Teresa subsequently built up the practice of what is now the national SHE team. Key areas of her recent practice have included regeneration projects, climate change law, the impact of Conservation Law on industrial operations, and a number of major health and safety investigations. For many years she has been a leading figure in the South Yorkshire Green Business Club and Teresa was recently appointed a Board Member for Sheffield First for Environment.

Event Chairman: Peter Matanle, School of East Asian Studies, University of Sheffield

Women and Leadership

22 May 2012

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The fourth seminar in our 2012 series Leadership: People and Power in the UK and Japan looks at Women and Leadership.  Japan remains one of the OECD’s poorest performers on gender equality issues, despite numerous attempts over the years to improve the situation. Only 11.3% of Japanese Diet members are women (a proportion recently surpassed by South Korea, with 14.7%). A survey of listed companies by Toyo Keizai last year found that women accounted for just 1.4% of management positions. And what about the UK, which elected its first female Prime Minister over 30 years ago? Even here, men in leadership positions still far outnumber women, and the gender debate is very much alive. Do we need quotas for female representation at the highest levels?  Our Japanese speaker is Dr Wakako Hironaka, one of the few women at the top level of Japanese politics, who became a State Minister almost 20 years ago, at a time when it was very difficult for women to succeed in this field. Our UK speaker is Suzi Digby OBE, Founder and Principal of The Voices Foundation, well-known as both a charity leader and a choral conductor. The seminar will be chaired by Joanna Pitman, former Tokyo Bureau Chief of The Times.

Dr Wakako Hironaka

Dr Wakako Hironaka is a former Member of the House of Councillors (1986-2010) and a former Vice-Chair of the Democratic Party of Japan.  Among her many roles, she has served as State Minister, Director-General of the Environment Agency (1993-94), Chair of the Committee on Fundamental National Policies, and Chair of the EU-Japan Parliamentary Group. Dr Hironaka has also been active internationally, as a Vice-Chair of Global Environmental Action, Chair of GLOBE Japan, and member of the World Commission on Forests and Sustainable Development, the Earth Charter Initiative, and International Science Advisory Board of UNESCO. She currently serves as Director-General of GEA, and as a Board Member of the Energy and Resources Institute, Earth Charter Commission and PA International Foundation. She was awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun by the Emperor Akihito in 2010.

Suzi Digby OBE (Lady Eatwell)

Suzi Digby OBE (Lady Eatwell) is an internationally renowned Choral Conductor and Music Educator. Born in Japan, Suzi lived internationally before settling in London/Cambridge. She has trailblazed the revival of singing in UK schools and the community over two decades. Suzi founded and runs four influential arts/education organisations: The Voices Foundation (the UK’s leading Music Education Charity); Voce Chamber Choir (one of London’s finest young Chamber Choirs); Vocal Futures (Nurturing young [16-22] audiences for Classical Music); and Artsworks (Leadership and ‘Accelerated Learning’ for Corporates). She is a Professor at the University of Southern California, where she is creating a Masters in Arts Leadership. As a conductor, Suzi’s 2011 debut with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (Vocal Futures’ Bach’s St Matthew Passion) was met with outstanding critical acclaim. Suzi is Trustee of Music in Country Churches, among other music and education charities. She is President of the Incorporated Society of Musicians and was Acting Music Director of Queens’ College, University of Cambridge. Amongst many TV appearances, she was judge in the BBC1 show, Last Choir Standing.

Joanna Pitman (chair)

Joanna Pitman was educated at Cambridge University where she read Japanese Studies. On graduating, she worked for a number of financial magazines in London before joining The Times. In 1989 she was appointed Tokyo Bureau Chief of The Times, a post she held for six years covering all news out of Japan and major stories in the region. Back in London, she became a writer on international affairs for The Times and did a series of major political interviews for the paper. Changing course, she spent ten years as an arts critic on The Times, and then when her children were older, she joined the strategic intelligence company, Hakluyt & Co. She is a trustee of Somerset House and of the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation. She has written two books: On Blondes(2004) and The Raphael Trail (2006).

BOOKING FORM

Japan SunDays – Milano

Post in Italian Language only.

Japan SunDays – Milano

–        presso WOW Spazio Fumettoviale Campania 12, Milano

–        domenica 6 maggio 2012 e 13 maggio 2012

–        durante l’orario di apertura del Museo (15:00-20:00)

–        ingresso gratuito

–        finissage all’interno della mostra “Dal Manga all’Anime – In viaggio con One Piece”, progetto patrocinato dal Consolato Generale del Giappone a Milano

Le domeniche giapponesi di WOW Spazio Fumetto segnano la chiusura di un periodo dedicato al Giappone e alle sue forme artistiche, inaugurato con la mostra “Dal Manga all’Anime – In viaggio con One Piece” (dal 9 marzo al 13 maggio 2012). Nel paese asiatico la modernità è ancorata potentemente alla tradizione, che si mantiene viva in tutti gli ambiti della quotidianità, e in particolare nelle Arti.

Riteniamo importante mostrare e far conoscere questo connubio unico tra passato e presente, così caratteristico della cultura nipponica: un paese dove ogni arte ha pari dignità. Una selezione di alcune espressioni artistiche sarà declinata in due domeniche, una principalmente dedicata alle Arti della tradizione e una dedicata al panorama artistico del Giappone contemporaneo. I visitatori potranno curiosare, sperimentare e approfondire questo pianeta attraverso stand dimostrativi, performance e workshop distribuiti all’interno degli spazi del museo e del nostro parco.

Con la preziosa collaborazione dell’Associazione Culturale Giappone in Italia e di Rossella Marangoni

DOMENICA 6 MAGGIO:

SARANNO PRESENTI DURANTE LA GIORNATA:

  • Pino Zema, studioso di kamishibai (“ dramma di carta”, forma espressiva del Giappone che unisce narrazione e immagini) e kamishibaiya (narratore” di kamishibai)
  • La maestra Anna Massari e la Chapter Ikebana Ohara Milano, con un’esposizione di alcune composizioni di ikebana (l’arte della disposizione dei fiori recisi) e di alcuni pezzi di ceramica raku (tecnica di ceramica giapponese)
  • L’artista di pittura giapponese tradizionale Shoko Okumura, con una mostra di alcune sue opere
  • L’Associazione culturale Shodo.it, nata per promuovere lo studio, la diffusione e la pratica della calligrafia sarà a disposizione con il maestro Bruno Riva per mostrare le diverse tecniche e stili di scrittura.
  • Mostra fotografica sul Giappone con opere di Ken Tani (all’interno del Gotham Cafè)
  • Mostra di giocattoli tradizionali giapponesi dalla collezione del Consolato Generale del Giappone a Milano

PROGRAMMA  ATTIVITA’:

  • 15:30 Workshop di origami a cura di Yukiko ed Elena Okabayashi
  • 16:30 Dimostrazione dell’arte dell’ikebana a cura di Anna Massari, maestra del Chapter Ikebana Ohara Milano
  • 17:00 Dimostrazione di arte calligrafica, su carta di grande formato, del maestro Bruno Riva e dell’Associazione culturale Shodo.it
  • 17:30 Dimostrazione di pittura tradizionale giapponese con Shoko Okumura
  • 18:00 Lezione a cura di Rossella Marangoni “Nel folto della foresta e nel profondo del mare”, sulle storie e leggende dell’antico Giappone
  • 18:45 concerto di tamburi taiko a cura di Takeshi Demise
  • Nell’arco del pomeriggio, performance di kamishibai a cura di Pino Zema

Sarà inoltre possibile gustare sushi e dolci giapponesi – in collaborazione con il ristorante Oasi Giapponese di Milano.