Far East Film Festival 2013

Competition

CHINA (10)

An Inaccurate Memoir, YANG Shupeng, action-western, China 2012, Italian Premiere
Beijing Flickers, ZHANG Yuan, drama, China 2012, Italian Premiere
Design of Death, GUAN Hu, black-comedy, China 2012, European Premiere
Feng Shui, WANG Jing, drama, China 2012, European Premiere
Finding Mr. Right, XUE Xiaolu, romance, HK/China 2013, International Festival Premiere
The Last Supper, LU Chuan, historical drama, China 2012, Italian Premiere
Lethal Hostage, CHENG Er, noirish drama, China 2012, Italian Premiere (in collaboration with Asian Film Festival, Reggio Emilia)
Lost in Thailand, XU Zheng, comedy, China 2012, European Premiere (in collaboration with CinemAsia Film Festival, Amsterdam)
Million Dollar Crocodile, LIN Lisheng, creature movie, China 2012, European Premiere
Painted Skin: The Resurrection, Wuershan, fantasy, China 2012, Italian Premiere (in collaboration with Future Film Festival, Bologna).

HONG KONG (7)

The Bullet Vanishes, LO Chi-leung, detective thriller, HK 2012, European Premiere
Cold War, Longman LEUNG, Sunny LUK, police action, HK 2012, European Premiere
The Guillotines, Andrew LAU, period-action, HK 2012, European Premiere
Ip Man – The Final Fight, Herman YAU, kung fu biopic, HK 2013, European Premiere
My Sassy Hubby, James YUEN, comedy-romance, HK 2012, International Festival Premiere
Saving General Yang, Ronny YU, period-action-thriller, HK 2013, European Premiere
The Way We Dance, Adam Wong, hip-hop dance romance, HK 2013, International Festival Premiere

INDONESIA (1)

Shackled, Upi, psycho-horror, Indonesia 2012, Italian Premiere

JAPAN (12)

Angel Home, TSUTSUMI Yukihiko, drama, Japan 2013, World Premiere
The Complex, NAKATA Hideo, horror, Japan 2013, Italian Premiere
The Floating Castle, INUDO Isshin, HIGUCHI Shinji, epic-action, Japan 2013, European Premiere
G’mor Evian!, YAMAMOTO Toru, punk family drama, Japan 2012, European Premiere
Girls for Keeps, FUKAGAWA Yoshihiro, comedy-drama, Japan 2012, European Premiere
I Have to Buy New Shoes, KITAGAWA Eriko, romance, Japan 2012, European Premiere
It’s Me, It’s Me, MIKI Satoshi, surrealistic-comedy, Japan 2013, World Premiere
Key of Life, UCHIDA Kenji, black comedy, Japan 2012, Italian Premiere
Maruyama, The Middle Schooler, KUDO Kankuro, self fellatio-comedy, Japan 2013, World Premiere
Rurouni Kenshin, OTOMO Keishi, period action-fantasy, Japan 2012, Italian Premiere
See You Tomorrow, Everyone, NAKAMURA Yoshihiro, coming-of-age drama, Japan 2013, International Festival Premiere
A Story of Yonosuke, OKITA Shuichi, nostalgic-drama, Japan 2013, International Festival Premiere

MALAYSIA (1)

Istanbul Here I Come, Bernard CHAULY, romance, Malaysia 2012, European Premiere

NORTH KOREA (BELGIUM-UK-NORTH KOREA) (1)

Comrade Kim Goes Flying, KIM Gwang-hun, Nicholas BONNER, Anja DAELEMANS, comedy-drama, BELGIUM-UK-NORTH KOREA 2012, Italian Premiere

THE PHILIPPINES (4)

I Do Bidoo Bidoo, Chris MARTINEZ, musical, The Philippines 2012, European Premiere
Mariposa in the Cage of the Night, Richard V. SOMES, thriller, The Philippines 2012, International Festival Premiere
The Strangers, Lawrence A. FAJARDO, horror, The Philippines 2012, International Festival Premiere
Tiktik: The Aswang Chronicles, Erik MATTI, action-horror, The Philippines 2012, International Festival Premiere

SOUTH KOREA (12)

All About My Wife, MIN Kyu-dong, comedy-romance, SK 2012, Italian Premiere
The Berlin File, RYOO Seung-wan, spy-action, SK 2013, European Premiere
EunGyo, JUNG Ji-woo, drama, SK 2012, European Premiere
Ghost Sweepers, SHIN Jung-won, ghost-comedy-horror, SK 2012, International Festival Premiere
How To Use Guys With Secret Tips, LEE Won-suk, gangnam style-comedy-romance, SK 2013, International Festival Premiere
Jury, KIM Dong-ho, funny apologue, SK 2013
Juvenile Offender, KANG Yi-kwan, youth-drama, SK 2012, Italian Premiere
National Security, CHUNG Ji-young, human rights drama, SK 2012, Italian Premiere
New World, PARK Hoon-jung, gangster epic, SK 2013, Italian Premiere
The Thieves, CHOI Dong-hoon, heist-action, SK 2012, Italian Premiere
A Werewolf Boy, JO Sung-hee, fantasy-romance, SK 2012, European Premiere
The Winter of the Year Was Warm, David CHO, drama, SK 2012, International Festival Premiere

TAIWAN (5)

Apolitical Romance, HSIEH Chun-yi, contemporary romantic comedy, Taiwan 2013, International Festival Premiere
GF*BF, YANG Ya-che, drama-romance, Taiwan 2012, Italian Premiere (in collaboration with Asian Film Festival, Reggio Emilia)
Forever Love, SHIAO Li-shiou, KITAMURA Toyoharu, comedy-romance, Taiwan 2013, European Premiere
Touch of the Light, CHANG Jung-chi, drama, Taiwan 2012, Italian Premiere
Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?, Arvin CHEN, romance, Taiwan 2013, Italian Premiere (in collaboration with Torino GLBT Film Festival)

THAILAND (5)

9-9-81, AAVV, horror, Thailandia 2012, International Festival Premiere
Countdown, Nattawut “Baz” POONPIRIYA, psycho-horror-thriller, Thailandia 2012 International Festival Premiere
The Gangster, Kongkiat KHOMSIRI, action-drama, Thailandia 2012, European Premiere
Home, Chookiat “Matthew” SAKVEERAKUL, romance-drama, Thailandia 2012, European Premiere
Long Weekend, Taweewat WANTHA, horror, Thailandia 2013, 2012 International Festival Premiere

Special Sections

 

KING HU IN HIS OWN WORDS – SPECIAL SECTION

My Lucky Star, HO Meng-hua, comedy, HK 1963
Raining in the Mountain, King HU, period-action, Taiwan/HK 1979
A Touch Of Zen, King HU, period-action, Taiwan 1971

THE QUIET MAN PASSES – REMEMBERING MARIO O’HARA

Demons, Mario O’Hara, The Philippines 2000

FRESH WAVE SHORTS (HONG KONG)

Before Friday, Enoch CHENG
Dong, Li Yushan
Flowers With Aphasia, Happyheart LI
God Bless All Parents, LAU Wing-tai
Heartbeat 48, Leo LAM
Such A Girl Like Me, MAN Uen-ching

WORLD PREMIERE = First public screening in the world
INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL PREMIERE = First festival screening in the world
EUROPEAN PREMIERE = First public screening in Europe
ITALIAN PREMIERE = First public screening in Italy

Can “Abenomics” Lift Japan Out of its 15-Year Deflation?

18 April 2013

6:00 – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:30pm

13/14 Cornwall Terrace, London, NW1 4QP

Organised by The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Japan has struggled with chronic deflation since its financial and real estate bubble burst 20 years ago, triggering a severe financial crisis in 1997-1998.  Since then, the Japanese economy has in fact grown in real terms, albeit sluggishly, as a result of extraordinary fiscal and monetary stimuli implemented in response to this crisis. Nonetheless, most Japanese now feel less well-off (unless they travel abroad to take advantage of the strong Yen) and Japanese industrial pre-eminence, especially in electronics, is being challenged by Korean competition. Against this backdrop, the LDP won the general election last December in a landslide, ushering into the limelight again Shinzo Abe (Prime Minister in 2006-7), who has since embarked on a new economic initiative, nicknamed “Abenomics, ” which has pushed equity markets up by more than 30%.  In this seminar the speakers address the question: ‘What is “Abenomics”, and can it achieve its goal of lifting Japan out of deflation?’  They also consider what its side-effects might be domestically, and what the implications could be for other advanced economies, especially the UK and Eurozone, which are experiencing their own prolonged period of economic troubles.

Yosuke Kawakami

Yosuke Kawakami was appointed Minister for Financial Affairs at the Embassy of Japan in July 2010, where he follows developments in UK fiscal, monetary and financial policies as well as in the London financial markets and represents Japanese interests in these areas. He is on secondment from the Japanese Ministry of Finance where he served as Director in the Financial Bureau, the Customs Bureau and the Minister’s Secretariat, as well as Deputy in the International Finance and Banking Bureaus.  He also has extensive overseas experience, having previously served at the IMF, OECD, and at the Embassy of Japan in Moscow in his 30 year career in public service. Since arriving in London, he has kept close watch on the near implosion of the Euro as well as the slow financial recovery and rising tensions in Europe, which has caused him to question the wisdom of the economics and finance professions, and thier ability to learn from past mistakes.

Andrew Smithers

Andrew Smithers started Smithers & Co. Ltd. in 1989 and now the firm provides advice on international asset allocation to more than 100 clients worldwide, covering the economies, stock, bond and currency markets of Japan, the US and major European countries. It is particularly well known for its work on the Japanese economy. Prior to starting his own firm, Andrew was at S.G.Warburg & Co. Ltd. where he ran the investment management business for some years.He read Economics at Cambridge, first visiting Japan in 1968 and living there from 1986 to 1989. He has been a regular contributor to the Nikkei Veritas Market Eye column (until Sept 2011) and to theLondon Evening Standard and Japan’s Sentaku magazine. His publications include: Valuing Wall Street with Stephen Wright, (McGraw-Hill, 2000) and Japan’s Key Challenges for the 21st Centurywith David Asher, published in Japanese by Diamond Press in 1999. He is a member of the Advisory Board for the Centre for International Macroeconomics and Finance (CIMF) at Cambridge and a Fellow of CFA (UK).

Edward Carr (Chair)

Edward Carr joined The Economist as a Science Correspondent in 1987. After a series of jobs covering electronics, trade, energy and the environment, he moved to Paris to write about European business. In 2000, after a period as Business Editor, he left for the Financial Times, where he worked most recently as News Editor. He returned to The Economist in 2005 as Britain Editor, and was Business Affairs Editor for several years before taking up his appointment as Foreign Editor in June 2009.

 

Social Innovation and New Solutions to Youth Unemployment: UK & Japan’s Emerging Youth Policy

12 March 2013

6:00 – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

13-14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle), London, NW14QP

In the UK, young people with low or no qualifications make up 39% of all young people unemployed and not in education, and 47% of those inactive and outside learning, despite only accounting for a quarter of the youth population. Tony Wilson, Policy Director of Inclusion, which delivers research and new approaches to policy that promote social inclusion in the labour market, will talk about the UK’s policy of intervention and provision of training to improve the employability of  British youth. His recent publications include the BIS research paper (Number 101) Youth Unemployment: Review of Training for Young People with Low Qualifications (Dept. for Business Innovation and Skills, February 2013).

From the 1960s onwards, Japan’s rapid economic growth generated internationally low levels of youth unemployment. This changed in the 1990s however, and by the 2000s, youth unemployment was recognised as a serious concern. Japan’s Emerging Youth Policy (Routledge, 2013) is based on extensive fieldwork that draws on both sociological and policy science approaches, and is the first book to investigate in detail how the state, experts, the media, and youth workers have reacted to the rise of youth joblessness in Japan. The book argues that entrepreneurial youth support leaders in Japan can provide sustainable, attractive solutions to the dilemmas that virtually all post-industrial nations currently face but have not yet seriously addressed. Dr Tuukka Toivonen, the author of the book, will discuss Japan’s emerging youth policy and attempt to bring evidence from Japan into a dialogue with the realities in other advanced nations, such as the UK.

Dr Tuukka Toivonen

Dr Tuukka Toivonen is Junior Research Fellow at Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, and is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Global Communications Centre (GLOCOM), the International University of Japan, Tokyo. He holds a DPhil in Social Policy from the University of Oxford, and is a graduate of Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University in Japan. He has held visiting positions at the universities of Kobe, Tokyo, Kyoto and Keio. He is a sociologist by training and has published several articles in world-class journals that comparatively analyse policy-making processes, youth problems and social innovations. He is also the co-editor of A Sociology of Japanese Youth: From Returnees to NEETs (Routledge, 2012). Currently, he is carrying out fieldwork on the evolution of social entrepreneurship and related innovation communities in Japan. Alongside his purely academic work, he also engages in social innovation activities himself as the founder and representative of Kansai RISE, which promotes young people’s creative involvement in public improvement and policy-making at regional level.

Tony Wilson

Tony Wilson joined Inclusion as Director in October 2011. He has more than ten years’ experience of policy and research, project management and delivery across a range of roles in HM Treasury, the Department for Work and Pensions and Jobcentre Plus. Since joining Inclusion, Tony has led on a range of projects including a feasibility study on developing a new employment programme in Northern Ireland, assessing approaches to tackling youth unemployment, the fragmentation of services for young people, and evaluations of programmes to increase employment among inactive groups. Most recently, Tony led on employment policy and delivery at HM Treasury: advising on labour market trends, policy responses to the downturn, delivery of welfare-to-work programmes and benefit reform. Prior to this he was responsible for the design and delivery of a number of Department for Work and Pensions employment projects. These included overseeing the development and introduction of the Future Jobs Fund, which created over 105,000 temporary jobs for long-term unemployed people. He was an expert policy adviser to David Freud on his independent review of welfare-to-work, published in 2007.

Organised by The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

BOOKING FORM

The Korean Peninsula Tensions and the Role of Other Powers

26 February 2013

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

13/14 Cornwall Terrace, London, NW1 4QP

 

After the “successful” launch on 12 December 2012 of yet another rocket in contravention of UN Security Council resolutions 1718 and 1874, the threat posed by North Korea appears ever more real. The stability of the Korean peninsula is not just a regional concern but also an issue for Europe, given the proliferation relationship between North Korea and Iran. How have political developments in the peninsula affected recent relations between the two Koreas? Can there be any easing of tensions between them under the new South Korean leader, Park Geun-hye? There are various reasons why multilateral engagement with, and coercion of, North Korea have failed to promote denuclearisation. Thomas Plant of ICSA, King’s College London, will consider if there is potential for progress, and look at Japan’s likely contribution under new Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Noriyuki Shikata, Political Minister at the Japanese Embassy in London, will discuss Japan’s perspective on the recent situation in the Korean Peninsula and explore the collaboration among Japan, the US, the UK, South Korea and China aimed at tackling the issue. The seminar will be chaired by Mark Fitzpatrick, Director of the Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Programme at the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

Noriyuki Shikata

Noriyuki Shikata is Political Minister at the Embassy of Japan in UK.  He was Deputy Cabinet Secretary for Public Affairs, Director of Global Communications at Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) of Japan (2010-2012). He was international media spokesperson at PMO, always accompanying the Prime Ministers’ trips overseas. He was the recipient of 2011 Gold Standard Award for Political Communications, at awards hosted by Public Affairs Asia. He graduated from the Law Department of Kyoto University in 1986. After entering MOFA in 1986, he worked at the Korea desk, and graduated from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, completing its Masters in Public Policy Program (International Affairs/Security) in 1989. His previous overseas postings include the Embassy in Washington, D.C.(1989 – 91), and the Delegation to the OECD in Paris(1999-2002). Between 2004 and 2010, he was Director of Status of U.S. Forces Agreement Division, Director of International Press Division, Director in Charge of Economic Relations with North America, and Director of Economic Treaties Division, International Legal Affairs, Bureau of Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA). His publications includeEnergy Policy of the Republic of Korea (2002: IEA; contributor), amongst others.

Thomas Plant

Thomas Plant is Research Fellow at the International Centre for Security Analysis (ICSA), King’s College London.  His main research interest is in North Korean issues, though he also works on wider regional security in East Asia and, more broadly, on nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament.  He joined ICSA on secondment from the Ministry of Defence; he has also spent time at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, where he worked on proliferation issues in the Middle East and East Asia.

Mark Fitzpatrick

Mark Fitzpatrick (Chair)  is Director of the Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Programme at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) in London. His programme focuses on nuclear and missile challenges posed by Iran, North Korea and other outlier states, and on nuclear security and nuclear disarmament issues. He is the editor of North Korean Security Challenges (July 2011) and of five other IISS Strategic Dossiers on countries and regions of proliferation concern. He has lectured throughout the world and is a frequent media commentator on proliferation topics. He joined the IISS in October 2005 after a 26-year career in the US Department of State, including as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Non-Proliferation (acting). He earned a Master’s degree in Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and he attended a one-year post-graduate study programme (1990-1991) at the Japanese National Institute of Defence, where his dissertation on Korean unification was published in journals in Japan and South Korea.

 

Art, events and bodies in 1960s Japan Talk by Peter Eckersall

30 January 2013 from 6.30pm, at the Japan Foundation, London

Through public and social events such as the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, the 1970 Osaka Expo and the radicalisation of the student protest movement, the 1960s in Japan can be considered an era of embodied cultural acts; events all engaging with experience of the body, whether it be athletics, the crowds who gathered at Expo, and mass rallies that took over the city streets and railway stations.  So too can a relationship with the body be identified in the arts of the 1960s, ranging from its use in stage performance, art events and the fascination with the body in cinema.

From Nagisa Oshima’s films about the protest movement to the Black Flag stage performance art events, Peter Eckersall, Associate Professor of Theatre Studies in the School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne and Research Fellow at the Centre for Interweaving Performance Cultures, Freie Universität Berlin, will discuss the various connections between the body, politics and action in the 1960s in the broader cultural context and look into how the era can be considered a decade of embodied gestures and events.  This event will give an insight to the state of arts and culture in the 1960s, an era marking a milestone in Japan.

 

Education and Social Class in the UK and Japan

29 January 2013

6:00 – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:30pm

13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle), London NW1 4QP

Organised by Daiwa Anglo Japanese Foundation

According to UNICEF, 12.1% of children in the UK are living in poverty, while the figure for Japan is 14.9% (Innocenti Report Card 10, May 2012). Since this report was produced, the economic situation has, if anything, deteriorated in both countries.  Inequality and social exclusion have become concerns again, and in a time of austerity for both the government and parents, the role of education needs reconsidering. Can education contribute to better social mobility? Are working-class groups still under-represented in higher education, and if so, why? Although higher education has become more inclusive in both countries in recent decades, if investing in education does not necessarily guarantee a job, then what is the incentive for young people to aspire to go to university? Professor Robert Cassen of LSE will look at social exclusion and education, and at government policies aimed at making life chances more equal, in pre-school, primary and secondary education. Issues of gender and ethnicity will also be explored. Professor Takehiko Kariya of Oxford University will analyse a new educational selection mechanism that has contributed to rising disparity in learning motivations after Japan’s education reforms in the 1990s, and will offer important insights for understanding similar problems in other countries.

Robert Cassen

Robert Cassen is Visiting Professor at the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics. He held his first post at LSE in 1961, and subsequently was a Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies in Sussex, and Director of Queen Elizabeth House and Professor of Development Economics at Oxford. He also served on the staff of the UK Department for International Development, the British High Commission in New Delhi, the World Bank, and the Brandt Commission. His books include Does Aid Work? (with associates, Oxford University Press, 1994); with Tim Dyson and Leela Visaria,  21st Century, India: Population, Economy, Human Development and the Environment (Oxford University Press, 2004); and with Geeta Kingdon, Tackling Low Educational Achievement: a Report for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2007. In 2008 he received an OBE for services to education. He is currently working on a new book, with Anna Vignoles and Sandra McNally:Making a Difference: What Works in Education and What Doesn’t, to be published by Routledge in 2014.

Takehiko Kariya

Takehiko Kariya is a Professor in the Sociology of Japanese Society, at the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies and the Department of Sociology, University of Oxford and he is a Faculty Fellow of St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research interests include the sociology of education, social stratification, school- to-work transition, educational and social policies, and social changes in postwar Japan. Before he joined Oxford University, he had taught sociology of education at the Graduate School of Education, University of Tokyo for 18 years. He is co-editor of Challenges to Japanese Education: Economics, Reforms, and Human Rights (Teachers College Press, 2010), the author of Education Reform and Social Class in Japan (Routledge, 2012) and Japanese Education and Society in Transition: A Sociology of Education Reforms, Opportunities and Mass Education during the Lost Decades (Routledge, forthcoming), and he has published more than 20 books in Japanese.

BOOKING FORM

Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2012 Exhibition Tokyo, SCAI THE BATHHOUSE, 18 January – 23 February 2013

18 January – 23 February 2013

Haroon Mirza, 2012 Daiwa Foundation Art Prize Winner, Solo exhibition at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE in Tokyo

We are delighted to present this solo exhibition by Haroon Mirza at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE in Tokyo, Japan. As the winner of the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2012, Mirza was given the opportunity to have this exhibition in Tokyo. Partnerships have been central to the successful realisation of the Art Prize and we are very grateful to Masami Shiraishi, President of SCAI THE BATHHOUSE, for agreeing to host this exhibition. I am confident that Mirza’s work will resonate strongly with Japanese audiences, and I hope also that his experiences in Japan will offer new inspirations for his artistic practice.

The Daiwa Foundation Art Prize aims to open doors in Japan for British artists. From over 700 initial applications, Haroon Mirza, Tom Hammick and Jennifer E. Price were shortlisted by our expert panel of judges – Jonathan Watkins, Mami Kataoka, Masami Shiraishi, Martin Gayford and Grayson Perry. Work by the short-listed artists was shown at the Daiwa Foundation Japan House Gallery in London in June and July 2012.

The Trustees of the Foundation join me in offering congratulations to Haroon Mirza. We hope that, in awarding the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize and holding this exhibition at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE, we will not only open new doors for British artists in Japan but also create valuable partnerships and opportunities for the future.

Jason James, Director General, Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

 

Art and Music and Haroon Mirza

 

“I was brought up Muslim … In certain regimes [in Islam] music is sort of frowned upon and related to things like infidelity and other terrible things if you listen to or engage with music”                                                                 

By Haroon Mirza

Haroon Mirza’s commitment to sound, to music in particular, is an intelligent challenge not only to the dogma of organized religion, but also to the institution of art. In Mirza’s work, music counteracts the religious tendencies in art, challenging the faith required to persist with the notion that art is somehow transcendent and distinct from everyday life.

Our ears, unlike our eyes, do not have lids. Waves of sound break through. Music is irresistible, undeniable, leaking in to affect us, insinuating, and pervasive. As a constant factor in the aesthetic equations devised by Haroon Mirza, music subtly contradicts the notion of a self-contained work of art, beautiful and true in itself. Our response to music stems from association, from the countless ideas and emotions we bring to our encounter with it, which can also be said of visual art.

Found objects, readymade and often ready-used, likewise occur in Mirza’s work as signs of free thinking, a philosophical scepticism that is, frankly, one of the only redeeming features of art. He knows, as we know, that the final artistic destinations of found objects were never envisaged by their makers, and so it becomes clear that this business of art is a question both of (our imaginative) projection and co-option. This applies as much to found objects that are works of art in their own right, and sounds that are music. All is revealed as being wonderfully unfixed.

Haroon Mirza was brought up Muslim. We were all brought up within some kind of prescriptive structure – be it ideological, religious and/or political – which insists that certain thoughts, tastes and behaviours are simply not acceptable. Art can be like that too, negative and dull. Haroon Mirza’s work, on the other hand, is life-affirming and positive.

 

Jonathan Watkins, Director Ikon Gallery

Haroon Mirza- Winner of the 2012 Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 

Haroon Mirza gained an MA in Fine Art at ChelseaCollegeof Art & Design with a Lynda Brockbank Scholarship (2007). He was awarded the Northern Art Prize 2010 and the Silver Lion for most promising young artist at the 54th Venice Biennale, 2011. He has participated in notable exhibitions including The British Art Show 7 (2011) organised by Hayward Touring, Preoccupied Waveforms (2012) at theNewMuseum inNew York, and the ninthGwangju Biennale inKorea.

 

Through his work, Mirza attempts to isolate the perceptual distinctions between noise, sound and music. He explores the potentiality for the visual and the acoustic to come together as one singular aesthetic form. These ideas are examined through lo-fi yet complex assemblages and installations that employ furniture, household electronics, video and existing artworks to formulate audio compositions with a temporal basis.

Image: Haroon Mirza, Digital Switchover, 2012 installation view of |||| ||, Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, 2012 Courtesy of the artist, and SCAI THE BATHHOUSE Photo by Gunner Meier