The Challenges of an Ageing Society in Japan

 

4 December 2012 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London

Ageing Society is a phenomenon happening not only in Japan but also in many other developed countries, and will soon spread to developing countries as well. In this seminar looking at how Japan is tackling this challenge, we have invited four speakers from Kobe University to address different aspects of the issue – Prof Naoki Mitani will look at the question of ageing in relation to Employment Policies in Japan; Prof Yuki Sekine will be considering the status of social security within an ageing society; Prof Masahiko Yoshii will be looking at the consequences for the Japanese economy of ageing; and, Prof Zhiwei Luowill examine Innovations in Health Engineering related to an Ageing Society. Each speaker will talk for 10-15 minutes, followed by time for discussion.

This event will be chaired by Professor Christina Victor of the School of Health Sciences and Social Care, Brunel University.

Prof Naoki Mitani has been Professor of Labour Economics at the Graduate School of Economics at Kobe University since the year 2000. He studied Mathematics at the Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo and obtained a Ph.D in Economics at Kobe University. His professional experiences include the positions of Deputy Director at the Ministry of Labour, as well as Administrator at OECD. He has published papers in various journals and books on topics such as the employment of older workers, youth and female workers, and the Japanese employment system.

Prof Yuki Sekine is Professor of Social Security Law at the Graduate School of Law, Kobe University. She holds a degree of Bachelor of Law from Universite Libre de Bruxelles, and a Master of Law from the University of Tokyo. She has worked for six years with the ILO, spending three years in the International Labour Standards Department in Geneva, and two years in detachment to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Tokyo, before joining Kobe University in 2004.

Prof Masahiko Yoshii has been Professor of the Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University since 1998, and is currently Dean of the Graduate School. He obtained a PhD in Economics at Kobe University in 2001. His major research interests are comparative economic systems, and the economics of Russia and Central-Eastern European countries.

Prof Zhiwei Luo obtained his PhD in Engineering from Nagoya University in 1992. From 1992 to 1994 he was an Assistant Professor of Toyohashi University of Technology. In 1994, he moved to BMC RIKEN as a Frontier Research. He then worked at Yamagata University as an Associate Professor. Since 2001, he served as laboratory head of BMC RIKEN, and led the development of a human interactive robot RI-MAN, which was selected by TIME as the best invention of 2006. In 2006, he became a Professor of Kobe University, where he joined the setting-up of the new Graduate School in System Informatics, and is now promoting integrative research on health for the Aging Society.

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please email your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.

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Healthcare Provision and Management in the UK and Japan

Seminar details:

14 June 2011

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Uncertain Futures: The Individual, Society and the State in the UK and Japan, will consider the issues surrounding healthcare provision and management in the UK and Japan. This is a highly topical area for debate in the UK as spending cuts and healthcare reforms focus attention on the ways in which the NHS must adapt to changing times. The Japanese health service is facing similar difficulties as Japan’s ageing population and low birth rate impact upon healthcare needs and provision. Our speakers bring both academic and professional perspectives to bear on this comparative discussion of the economics and social dynamics of healthcare provision.

Professor Kiyoshi Morita

Kiyoshi Morita is Director of Okayama University Hospital. He has also been Head of Okayama University since December, 2010. Since graduating the University Medical School with MD in 1974 he has been specializing in anaesthesiology in many hospitals in the South part of Japan. From 1978 to1980 he was Fellow of Anaesthesiology of Albert Einstein Medical College, Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center, New York, USA. In 1984 he started teaching at Okayama University while practicing at the hospital. He is Professor at Department of Anaesthesiology and Resuscitology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences. In 2004-2009 He was a Board of Directors, The Japanese Society on Intensive Care Medicine. Since 2009 he is President of the Japanese Society of Anaesthesiologists.

Professor Gwyn Bevan

Gwyn Bevan is Professor of Management Science in Department of Management Research at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has worked as an academic at Warwick Business School and in Medical Schools in London and Bristol. He has also worked in industry, consulting, the Treasury, and for the Commission for Health Improvement (CHI). His current research includes studies of outcomes of the natural experiment of different policies in UK countries for the NHS and schools following devolution; and the SyMPOSE (Systems Modelling for Performance Optimisation and Service Equity) project funded by the Health Foundation, which is a programme of collaborative research that aims to reduce expenditure on health care with least harm to the health of populations and without widening inequalities in health.

Dr Jonathan Batchelor

Jonathan Batchelor is a consultant dermatologist at Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust and researcher at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology at the University of Nottingham. His research interests include the methodology and reporting of dermatology clinical trials, and the application of the principle of evidence-based medicine to in the field of clinical dermatology. He is currently involved in developing feasibility work for clinical trial of treatments for vitiligo and is on the steering committee for the Eczema Priority Setting Partnership which, in conjunction with the James Lind Alliance, seeks to involve both clinicians and patients in the process of identifying future research priorities in the field of eczema treatments. Dr Batchelor was a Daiwa Scholar in 2001-3, spending a year at the National Centre for Child Health and Development, where he undertook research on patients’ ability to assess the reliability of health information. He was also a visiting doctor at the Showa University Department of Dermatology.

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