Japanese from Scratch

 

29 August 2012 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London

Japanese from Scratch is a new series of Japanese language and culture workshops from the Japan Foundation London, suitable for those who are interested in learning Japanese but haven’t started yet, or those who have just started learning.

:: This evening’s theme: Travel in Japan

Learn how to make the most of your experience in Japan,including:

– Professional advice & tips for travellers
– Essential Japanese language, including greetings, dining and etiquette
– Access to information from travel companies

Date & Time: August 29th 2012, 18:30 – 21:00 (Registration from 18:00)

This workshop is for those intersted in travelling to Japan, Japanese culture or learning Japanese. Instructions and explanations will be in English.

:: Speakers

Yumi Takakubo  Trade Partnerships & Marketing Manager
Japan National Tourism Organisation (JNTO)

Seiji Fukushima  Chief Japanese Language Advisor
Japan Foundation London

:: Fee and Booking

Fee: Only £5.00 – Includes Japanese food and drink taster, and a small Japanese gift. The fee must be paid in cash only on arrival. We cannot accept cheques or credit cards.

Booking: Please click here to book online
*The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation.

Advance booking is essential. This workshop is limited to 100 – strictly first come, first served.

This is event is co-organised by the Japan Foundation London and the Japan National Tourism Organisation (JNTO).

*The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation.The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation.
*The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation.The registration form uses Google Forms and is subject to Google’s standard terms and conditions of use. Alternatively, you may register by downloading and printing the PDF application form below, completing it by hand and sending it to the Japan Foundation

 

 
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Video Games in Japan: Past, Present and Future The Present and Future: Progress to Next Level?

22 February 2012 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation
10-12 Russell Square
London, WC1B 5EH

Video Games in Japan: Past, Present and Future 
The Present and Future: Progress to Next Level? – Where is the Japanese Video Game Industry heading?

In 2008, the market for the consumption of video games in the UK became the second largest in the world, and it is still expanding. Within this situation, it is common knowledge that a great number of the games people in the UK play every day are made in Japan. However, the Japanese game industry, which has held an advantage for a long time, is now facing a series of challenges as new centres of video game production appear in developing countries. How can Japanese companies strengthen their position in markets around the world, taking into account the emergence of social gaming? Is the solution to prioritise the development of their human resources and rationalise the process of making games?

Prof Akira Baba, University of Tokyo, will make a presentation on the current situation and problems of the Japanese Game Industries and Takuma Endo, president of ACQUIRE and Development Director of Tenchu, a game which has sold 1.5million copies, will talk about where Japanese game makers are going. Steve Boxer, freelance journalist and member of the award-winning Video Games coverage team at The Guardian will respond to their presentations as a discussant.

There will be a prize-draw during the evening to win tickets to attend the Hyper Japan event, which takes place from 24th-26th February.

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please email your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.

Tokyo is trending: the rise of J-Pop

From the Sweet Lolitas to the anime addicts, expect to see much more of these Japanese fashion tribes across London in the immediate future. We’re heading for a Tokyo takeover. Do you want to know more? Read on….

While the emergence of K-Pop, the South Korean pop music phenomenon, was big news late last year, in 2012 it’s J-Pop that is taking centre stage with London’s teens – and bringing with it a Japanese street-style scene.

As Japan is the world’s second largest music market behind the US, its latest export already has a massive cult youth following and London’s club scene has been quick to embrace the trend.

New Bloomsbury Lanes club night Japan Underground boasts live bands and music from top J-Pop and J-Rock DJs. The launch night, themed on the cult Samurai fighting game Sengoku Basara, sold out and the venue’s next night, on February 4, is set to be a Japanese tribute to the best of the West – with a full DJ set of remixed dance-floor hits and a Queen cover band.

But music is not the only aspect of Japanese culture that has engrossed London’s youth. Current J-Pop icons, such as nine-strong girl group Morning Musume and oshare kei three-piece ALiBi, have found fame as much through their eccentric fashion. Self-confessed queen of kook Kyary Pamyu Pamyu started life as a style blogger before turning to music, while Ayumi Hamasaki – known as Ayu to her fans and the Empress of J-Pop to the media – embodies a constantly changing image which earned her Japanese campaigns with London-based brands Rimmel and Aquascutum last year, as well as becoming the first J-Pop artist to have a number one album for 13 consecutive years since her debut.

Iconic Japanese street fashion, most notably hailing from the Harajuku shopping district of Tokyo, is being adopted by many style tribes, from the black lace grunge of Gothic Lolita to the glam rock aesthetic of Visual Kei and the purveyors of all things cute and fluffy, Kawaii. But, J-Pop artists aside, several Western pop stars have moulded their image in the same quirky way. Style extremist Nicki Minaj and blue-haired chameleon Katy Perry are currently helping to make the look mainstream.

This season the unique Japanese street style has also trickled into high fashion circles. On the spring/summer 2012 catwalks the look was championed by eclectic London Fashion Week designers Meadham Kirchhoff, who layered frilled blouses with teddy bear pinafores and paired knee-high socks with pom-pom Geta sandals. Miu Miu also teamed A-line patchwork skirts, crop tops and off-the-shoulder capes that reflected the doll-like styling favoured by Lolitas.

But for the devoted Londoners – for whom Japanese styling is more than just a fashion trend – there is a Far East fest coming to the capital. Next month, Japanese culture convention Hyper Japan heads to Brompton Hall, celebrating everything from sushi and sake to J-Pop and Harajuku. From the Sweet Lolitas to the anime addicts, expect to see much more of these Japanese fashion tribes across London in the immediate future. We’re heading for a Tokyo takeover.

Article written by Emma McCarthy, published on Evening Standard (23/01/12)

Muse London:The 4th UK Korean Artists Exhibition

16 December 2011 – 21 January 2012

The Korean Cultural Centre UK presents the 4th Annual Exhibition of contemporary art by UK Korean Artists.

 Focusing on video works, ‘Muse London’ brings together the exciting work of six artists, all living and working in London.

 Participating artists:

Eemyun KANG, Seokyeong KANG, EE, Wonwoo LEE, Sean ROH and Kiwoun SHIN

 From 16 December 2011 to 21 January 2012 the exhibition MUSE LONDON brings a showcase of Contemporary Media Art to the KCC.

 The exhibition dwells more specifically on the artists’ interior world as seen through the lens of a foreign world city. The artworks give highly personal reports of the ‘London experience’ told through interviews, documentary snippets, exotic fantasy, paranoia and studied reflections.

 The exhibition has been guest curated by Jeremy AKERMAN and managed Ji Hye HONG (KCC UK).

 I.The participating artists for the exhibition ‘MUSE LONDON: THE 4th UK KOREAN ARTISTS EXHIBITION’ are, in alphabetical order:

 1.EE is currently studying MA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design. <Maniac> video clip presents a unique persona of this husband-and-wife duo. With the element of kitsch and pop culture of its shiny and amusing surface, EE delivers the explosion and clash in its own way of irony and humour.

  2.Eemyun KANG completed Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art at the Royal Academy of Arts, London. She launched the interviews with artists to share diverse idea and approaches on the idea of Mystic Island in London. The video clip brings a poetic rhythm made by layers of interview. This intriguing corresponding is later developed to various forms of art. Her canvasses capture the imaged landscape that continues endlessly.   

 3.Seokyeong KANG is currently undertaking an MA in Painting at the Royal College of Art in London. By reshoot in the space of KCC, the mirror-like simulacrum leads the audience to come across with the ethereal traces of memory.  Her formal interest in emptiness, blank space and emotional movement is coupled with an intuitive understanding of leftovers such as leathers, threads and fabric.   

 4.Wonwoo LEE is currently studying an MA in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art, London. His practice is concerned with spatial interventions, transforming objects and phenomenon which is related in physical and social realm. He focuses on making actual happenings that can change the given situations turned into imaginary and uncanny situations. <A drummer’s room> is stemmed from the personal experience of spatial change by occupation of sound.

 5.Sean ROH is studying an MFA in Media at Slade School of Fine Art, University College London. With his witty manipulation of ordinary objects that found in everyday life, he makes a stage of storytelling. Based on his series of photographs, the ordinary life and episodes in London is told in first point of view. Every scene speaks volume for itself.

 6.Kiwoun SHIN completed MFA Fine Art at Goldsmiths College in 2010. The visual analysis of the existence expands the his experiments from grinding to evaporating.   <Missing time never exist> and <News becomes entertainment> is a record while a cup of wine was evaporated. While he tries to emphasise and make the scenes more dramatic and theatrical with music, Kiwoun explores the political layer and visual icons of media and eventually questions the visual reality.  

 II.Guest Curator: Jeremy AKERMAN

Jeremy is an artist and editor of artists’ writing. He is an independent curator with a deep enthusiasm for Korean art in particular. <MUSE LONDON> is Jeremy’s second Exhibition at the KCC with the emerging young Korean artists.  

 III.The Korean Cultural Centre UK      

Director: WON Yonggi    

The Korean Cultural Centre UK (KCCUK) was opened by the Korean Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism in January 2008 under the aegis of the London Embassy of the Republic of Korea. The role of the KCCUK is to further enhance friendship, amity and understanding between Korea and the UK through cultural and educational activities.

 From the KCCUK's central London location near Trafalgar Square, its dedicated cultural team work to further develop cultural projects, introduce new opportunities to expand their Korean events programme in the UK, and encourage cultural exchange. Facilities at the centre include a gallery, small theatre, lecture room, a multimedia centre and library.

United Cube Concert in London

Date and Time: 5th December 2011, Doors open 17:30, Show 19:30

Place: O2 Academy Brixton

Tickets: Visit Live Nation or Ticketmaster

Cube Entertainment will hold ‘United Cube in London’ concerts starting on December 5th at the O2 Brixton Academy.

 The concert plans to show off what k-pop has to offer through the dynamic performances of 4minute, B2ST, and G.NA, through two segments, and capture the hearts of 5,000 European fans.

 O2 Brixton Academy has been the home to many legendary performances from Madonna, Bob Dylan, Marilyn Manson, Rihanna, etc. Cube artists will be the first Asian artist to perform at the facility.

  Cube Entertainment stated, “‘United Cube Concert’s venture into London, the birthplace of pop and rock, during the beginning of the Kpop movement is especially meaningful and something to be proud of… This will be an opportunity to ignite the flame of Kpop which has gone beyond the boundaries of the digital silk road.”

 Doojoon, the leader of B2ST, stated, “For all the European fans who have been waiting, we are so glad that this concert in England has been confirmed… We are already excited thinking about performing at a place where many artists that we look up to, have performed. As the starting point [of a venture into Europe], we will prepare a concert in England that will be unforgettable to everyone.”

Tengu: The Shamanic and Esoteric origins of the Japanese Martial Arts by Roald Knutsen

Book Launch

6 December 2011 from 6.00pm

The Japan Foundation, London
10-12 Russell Square
London, WC1B 5EH

This fully illustrated volume is the first in-depth study in English to examine the warrior and shamanic characteristics and significance oftengu in the martial art culture (bugei) of Muromachi Japan. Prompting Roald Knutsen’s life-long study of tengu – part-human, part-animal creatures – was the realisation that they were interacting with the deadly serious bugei masters teaching the arts of war. Here were beings who did not conform to the comic, goblin-like creatures of common folklore and were not the creations of the Buddhist priests intent on demonising that which they did not understand and could not control.

Roald Knutsen has practised traditional Kenjutsu, Kendo, Iai-jutsu, and So-jutsu under a succession of famous Japanese masters, having menkyo-kaiden (senior master’s licence), in one of the oldest transmissions of Iai-jutsu, and the rank of 7th dan Renshi in Kendo. He has researched and written extensively about the Japanese warrior traditions and aspects of Japanese history. Clive Sinclaire will act as discussant at this event – he is a very active kendo practitioner who runs a dojo in Kent, with over thirty years involvement with the To-ken society, an organisation dedicated to the study of Japanese swords, fittings and armour.

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please email your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

 

JAPAN: Kingdom of Characters – A Talk by Hiroyuki Aihara

2 December 2011 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London
Russell Square House
10-12 Russell Square
London, WC1B 5EH

From Pokémon to Hello Kitty, a remarkable quality and range of Japanese subcultures has been sweeping the world, most notably in manga, anime, and more recently computer games. Indeed, the Japanese have long lived with this culture, nurturing a passion for the variety of characters around them.

Prior to the opening of the Japan Foundation’s exhibition, JAPAN: Kingdom of Charactersin February 2012, which will pay homage to the creation of many diverse figures since the 1950s, the Japan Foundation has invited Hiroyuki Aihara, President of the Character Research Institute and main curator of the exhibition, to explore in an illustrated talk the loving relationship between Japanese society and characters, mapping it in an historical context. The impact that such characters have had, both upon Japanese society and on global society, shall also be discussed.

This talk will provide an insight into the world of Japanese characters. Audience members are encouraged to wear or carry their favourite character as a tribute!

This talk event is organised in association with the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts.
The Japan Foundation exhibition JAPAN: Kingdom of Characters will open at the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, Norwich, on 4th February 2012.

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please email your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk