China and Regional Security: How Should Neighbouring Powers Respond?

30 April 2013, 6:00 – 7:45pm

Commitee Room 14, The House of Commons, Westminster, London SW1 2TT

China’s continuing enhancement of its international presence is a result both of the country’s growing economic and military strength and its perception of a weakened US. This is in contrast to Deng’s policy of keeping a low profile, and appears at odds with ongoing talk of harmony and peaceful development. Since 2008, China has been increasingly assertive in its approach to territorial issues, not only with Japan, but also with other neighbouring countries. How are these nations to respond? Are there only two alternatives – counter-action or surrender? What about legal/ diplomatic options, including submitting the case to international arbitration? Can China and its neighbours still build stable and cooperative ‘win-win’ strategic relationships to deal with regional security issues such as North Korean nuclear aggression, boundary questions and navigation and resource rights? Or has the long-standing neglect of a historical problem combined with old disputes and new power configurations now set a course of conflict for the next generation? How do US interests play into these questions? Now that the political and economic focus seems to have shifted to the Asia-Pacific region, the attitudes of China and its neighbouring countries will have implications for Europe too. This seminar will examine these themes and consider them from a neutral British perspective, also addressing how the new leaders of China and Japan are dealing with the growing tensions in the region, and the negative attitudes towards each other fostered by the territorial disputes between them.

Professor Michael Clarke

Professor Michael Clarke is currently the Director General of the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI). Until July 2007, he was Deputy Vice-Principal and Director of Research Development at King’s College London. He was the founding Director of the Centre for Defence Studies and of the International Policy Institute at King’s. He has taught international politics at the Universities of Aberystwyth, Manchester, Newcastle, and the Open University. He has been a Specialist Adviser to the House of Commons Defence Committee since 1997. In 2004, he was appointed the UK member of the UN Secretary General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters. In 2009, he was appointed to the Prime Minister’s National Security Forum and in 2010 to the Chief of Defence Staff’s new Strategic Advisory Group. His recent publications include: The Afghan Papers: Committing Britain to War in Helmand2005-06, London, RUSI/Routledge 2011; ‘Strategic Posture Review: United Kingdom’, World Politics Review, November 2011; ‘Does War Have a Future?’, in Lindley-French and Boyar (eds), The Oxford Handbook of War, Oxford, OUP, 2012.

Professor Barry Buzan

Professor Barry Buzan is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), Honorary Professor at Copenhagen and Jilin Universities, and a Senior Fellow at LSE Ideas. During 1993 he was a visiting professor at the International University of Japan, and from 1997-98 he was Olof Palme Visiting Professor in Sweden. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the British Academy. Among his books are:Security: A New Framework for Analysis (1998, with Ole Wæver and Jaap de Wilde); International Systems in World History: Remaking the Study of International Relations (2000, with Richard Little);Regions and Powers: The Structure of International Security (2003, with Ole Wæver); The Evolution of International Security Studies (2009, with Lene Hansen); and Non-Western International Relations Theory (2010, co-edited with Amitav Acharya).

Sir David Warren

Sir David Warren was British Ambassador to Japan from 2008 to 2012. This followed a career in the Diplomatic Service that focused on East Asian affairs, in which he served three times in the British Embassy in Tokyo (1977-1981; 1993-1998; 2008-2012), and as head of the FCO’s China Hong Kong Department (1998-2000). He was also a member of the team that set up the Government’s business promotion agency, UK Trade and Investment, from 2000 to 2004, and Director of Human Resources for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (and a Board member) 2004-2007. He retired from the Diplomatic Service in January 2013, and has since become a Visiting Professor at Sheffield and De Montfort Universities, and is also Chairman of the Japan Society.

Rod Wye

Rod Wye is currently an Associate Fellow with the Asia Programme at Chatham House and a Senior Fellow in the China Policy Institute atNottingham. He was an analyst specialising in China and East Asia for over thirty years in the Research Analysts of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. He also did two postings inChina as First Secretary in the British Embassy in Beijing in 1985-88 and again in 1995-99, and Deputy Head of the China Hong Kong Department in 1999-2002.

Dr Bobo Lo (Chair)

Dr Bobo Lo is an independent scholar and consultant. He was previously Director of the Russia and China Programmes at the Centre for European Reform; Head of the Russia and Eurasia Programme at Chatham House. Dr Lo writes extensively on Russian and Chinese foreign policy. His books include Russiaand the New World Disorder (Brookings and Chatham House, forthcoming in 2013), Axis of Convenience: Moscow, Beijing and the New Geopolitics (Brookings and Chatham House, 2008). Other recent writings include ‘Kinder, gentler geopolitics’, Caixin Media, 22 January 2013, ‘A 21st century myth – authoritarian modernization in Russia and China’ (with Lilia Shevtsova), Carnegie Moscow Center Report, June 2012; ‘What can we learn from China’s modernisation?’, Diplomaatia,May 2012; ‘The Russia-China-US triangle and its post-Cold War fate’, in Robert E. Bedeski and Niklas Swanstrom (eds), and ‘How the Chinese See Russia’,French Institute of International Relations, Dec 2010.

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Far East Film Festival 2013

Competition

CHINA (10)

An Inaccurate Memoir, YANG Shupeng, action-western, China 2012, Italian Premiere
Beijing Flickers, ZHANG Yuan, drama, China 2012, Italian Premiere
Design of Death, GUAN Hu, black-comedy, China 2012, European Premiere
Feng Shui, WANG Jing, drama, China 2012, European Premiere
Finding Mr. Right, XUE Xiaolu, romance, HK/China 2013, International Festival Premiere
The Last Supper, LU Chuan, historical drama, China 2012, Italian Premiere
Lethal Hostage, CHENG Er, noirish drama, China 2012, Italian Premiere (in collaboration with Asian Film Festival, Reggio Emilia)
Lost in Thailand, XU Zheng, comedy, China 2012, European Premiere (in collaboration with CinemAsia Film Festival, Amsterdam)
Million Dollar Crocodile, LIN Lisheng, creature movie, China 2012, European Premiere
Painted Skin: The Resurrection, Wuershan, fantasy, China 2012, Italian Premiere (in collaboration with Future Film Festival, Bologna).

HONG KONG (7)

The Bullet Vanishes, LO Chi-leung, detective thriller, HK 2012, European Premiere
Cold War, Longman LEUNG, Sunny LUK, police action, HK 2012, European Premiere
The Guillotines, Andrew LAU, period-action, HK 2012, European Premiere
Ip Man – The Final Fight, Herman YAU, kung fu biopic, HK 2013, European Premiere
My Sassy Hubby, James YUEN, comedy-romance, HK 2012, International Festival Premiere
Saving General Yang, Ronny YU, period-action-thriller, HK 2013, European Premiere
The Way We Dance, Adam Wong, hip-hop dance romance, HK 2013, International Festival Premiere

INDONESIA (1)

Shackled, Upi, psycho-horror, Indonesia 2012, Italian Premiere

JAPAN (12)

Angel Home, TSUTSUMI Yukihiko, drama, Japan 2013, World Premiere
The Complex, NAKATA Hideo, horror, Japan 2013, Italian Premiere
The Floating Castle, INUDO Isshin, HIGUCHI Shinji, epic-action, Japan 2013, European Premiere
G’mor Evian!, YAMAMOTO Toru, punk family drama, Japan 2012, European Premiere
Girls for Keeps, FUKAGAWA Yoshihiro, comedy-drama, Japan 2012, European Premiere
I Have to Buy New Shoes, KITAGAWA Eriko, romance, Japan 2012, European Premiere
It’s Me, It’s Me, MIKI Satoshi, surrealistic-comedy, Japan 2013, World Premiere
Key of Life, UCHIDA Kenji, black comedy, Japan 2012, Italian Premiere
Maruyama, The Middle Schooler, KUDO Kankuro, self fellatio-comedy, Japan 2013, World Premiere
Rurouni Kenshin, OTOMO Keishi, period action-fantasy, Japan 2012, Italian Premiere
See You Tomorrow, Everyone, NAKAMURA Yoshihiro, coming-of-age drama, Japan 2013, International Festival Premiere
A Story of Yonosuke, OKITA Shuichi, nostalgic-drama, Japan 2013, International Festival Premiere

MALAYSIA (1)

Istanbul Here I Come, Bernard CHAULY, romance, Malaysia 2012, European Premiere

NORTH KOREA (BELGIUM-UK-NORTH KOREA) (1)

Comrade Kim Goes Flying, KIM Gwang-hun, Nicholas BONNER, Anja DAELEMANS, comedy-drama, BELGIUM-UK-NORTH KOREA 2012, Italian Premiere

THE PHILIPPINES (4)

I Do Bidoo Bidoo, Chris MARTINEZ, musical, The Philippines 2012, European Premiere
Mariposa in the Cage of the Night, Richard V. SOMES, thriller, The Philippines 2012, International Festival Premiere
The Strangers, Lawrence A. FAJARDO, horror, The Philippines 2012, International Festival Premiere
Tiktik: The Aswang Chronicles, Erik MATTI, action-horror, The Philippines 2012, International Festival Premiere

SOUTH KOREA (12)

All About My Wife, MIN Kyu-dong, comedy-romance, SK 2012, Italian Premiere
The Berlin File, RYOO Seung-wan, spy-action, SK 2013, European Premiere
EunGyo, JUNG Ji-woo, drama, SK 2012, European Premiere
Ghost Sweepers, SHIN Jung-won, ghost-comedy-horror, SK 2012, International Festival Premiere
How To Use Guys With Secret Tips, LEE Won-suk, gangnam style-comedy-romance, SK 2013, International Festival Premiere
Jury, KIM Dong-ho, funny apologue, SK 2013
Juvenile Offender, KANG Yi-kwan, youth-drama, SK 2012, Italian Premiere
National Security, CHUNG Ji-young, human rights drama, SK 2012, Italian Premiere
New World, PARK Hoon-jung, gangster epic, SK 2013, Italian Premiere
The Thieves, CHOI Dong-hoon, heist-action, SK 2012, Italian Premiere
A Werewolf Boy, JO Sung-hee, fantasy-romance, SK 2012, European Premiere
The Winter of the Year Was Warm, David CHO, drama, SK 2012, International Festival Premiere

TAIWAN (5)

Apolitical Romance, HSIEH Chun-yi, contemporary romantic comedy, Taiwan 2013, International Festival Premiere
GF*BF, YANG Ya-che, drama-romance, Taiwan 2012, Italian Premiere (in collaboration with Asian Film Festival, Reggio Emilia)
Forever Love, SHIAO Li-shiou, KITAMURA Toyoharu, comedy-romance, Taiwan 2013, European Premiere
Touch of the Light, CHANG Jung-chi, drama, Taiwan 2012, Italian Premiere
Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?, Arvin CHEN, romance, Taiwan 2013, Italian Premiere (in collaboration with Torino GLBT Film Festival)

THAILAND (5)

9-9-81, AAVV, horror, Thailandia 2012, International Festival Premiere
Countdown, Nattawut “Baz” POONPIRIYA, psycho-horror-thriller, Thailandia 2012 International Festival Premiere
The Gangster, Kongkiat KHOMSIRI, action-drama, Thailandia 2012, European Premiere
Home, Chookiat “Matthew” SAKVEERAKUL, romance-drama, Thailandia 2012, European Premiere
Long Weekend, Taweewat WANTHA, horror, Thailandia 2013, 2012 International Festival Premiere

Special Sections

 

KING HU IN HIS OWN WORDS – SPECIAL SECTION

My Lucky Star, HO Meng-hua, comedy, HK 1963
Raining in the Mountain, King HU, period-action, Taiwan/HK 1979
A Touch Of Zen, King HU, period-action, Taiwan 1971

THE QUIET MAN PASSES – REMEMBERING MARIO O’HARA

Demons, Mario O’Hara, The Philippines 2000

FRESH WAVE SHORTS (HONG KONG)

Before Friday, Enoch CHENG
Dong, Li Yushan
Flowers With Aphasia, Happyheart LI
God Bless All Parents, LAU Wing-tai
Heartbeat 48, Leo LAM
Such A Girl Like Me, MAN Uen-ching

WORLD PREMIERE = First public screening in the world
INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL PREMIERE = First festival screening in the world
EUROPEAN PREMIERE = First public screening in Europe
ITALIAN PREMIERE = First public screening in Italy

The Korean Peninsula Tensions and the Role of Other Powers

26 February 2013

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

13/14 Cornwall Terrace, London, NW1 4QP

 

After the “successful” launch on 12 December 2012 of yet another rocket in contravention of UN Security Council resolutions 1718 and 1874, the threat posed by North Korea appears ever more real. The stability of the Korean peninsula is not just a regional concern but also an issue for Europe, given the proliferation relationship between North Korea and Iran. How have political developments in the peninsula affected recent relations between the two Koreas? Can there be any easing of tensions between them under the new South Korean leader, Park Geun-hye? There are various reasons why multilateral engagement with, and coercion of, North Korea have failed to promote denuclearisation. Thomas Plant of ICSA, King’s College London, will consider if there is potential for progress, and look at Japan’s likely contribution under new Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Noriyuki Shikata, Political Minister at the Japanese Embassy in London, will discuss Japan’s perspective on the recent situation in the Korean Peninsula and explore the collaboration among Japan, the US, the UK, South Korea and China aimed at tackling the issue. The seminar will be chaired by Mark Fitzpatrick, Director of the Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Programme at the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

Noriyuki Shikata

Noriyuki Shikata is Political Minister at the Embassy of Japan in UK.  He was Deputy Cabinet Secretary for Public Affairs, Director of Global Communications at Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) of Japan (2010-2012). He was international media spokesperson at PMO, always accompanying the Prime Ministers’ trips overseas. He was the recipient of 2011 Gold Standard Award for Political Communications, at awards hosted by Public Affairs Asia. He graduated from the Law Department of Kyoto University in 1986. After entering MOFA in 1986, he worked at the Korea desk, and graduated from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, completing its Masters in Public Policy Program (International Affairs/Security) in 1989. His previous overseas postings include the Embassy in Washington, D.C.(1989 – 91), and the Delegation to the OECD in Paris(1999-2002). Between 2004 and 2010, he was Director of Status of U.S. Forces Agreement Division, Director of International Press Division, Director in Charge of Economic Relations with North America, and Director of Economic Treaties Division, International Legal Affairs, Bureau of Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA). His publications includeEnergy Policy of the Republic of Korea (2002: IEA; contributor), amongst others.

Thomas Plant

Thomas Plant is Research Fellow at the International Centre for Security Analysis (ICSA), King’s College London.  His main research interest is in North Korean issues, though he also works on wider regional security in East Asia and, more broadly, on nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament.  He joined ICSA on secondment from the Ministry of Defence; he has also spent time at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, where he worked on proliferation issues in the Middle East and East Asia.

Mark Fitzpatrick

Mark Fitzpatrick (Chair)  is Director of the Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Programme at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) in London. His programme focuses on nuclear and missile challenges posed by Iran, North Korea and other outlier states, and on nuclear security and nuclear disarmament issues. He is the editor of North Korean Security Challenges (July 2011) and of five other IISS Strategic Dossiers on countries and regions of proliferation concern. He has lectured throughout the world and is a frequent media commentator on proliferation topics. He joined the IISS in October 2005 after a 26-year career in the US Department of State, including as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Non-Proliferation (acting). He earned a Master’s degree in Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and he attended a one-year post-graduate study programme (1990-1991) at the Japanese National Institute of Defence, where his dissertation on Korean unification was published in journals in Japan and South Korea.

 

Russia, China and Global Governance

21 June 2012

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

With the rise of non-Western nations in the new world order, the need for international cooperation and global governance on economic, financial and security issues has never been greater.  But the emerging multipolar order does not seem to have contributed to global stability so far. The US, the EU and Japan are working to persuade the BRICS to take multilateral institutions more seriously, though the US itself often seems ambivalent about multilateralism. Most European governments know that they have a big interest in effective multilateral institutions. The behaviour of Russia and China – both veto-wielding permanent members of the UN Security Council – is particularly crucial in dealing with global challenges, including climate change and peace-keeping operations.  What is Japan’s role within global institutions such as the G20, the WTO and the UN? Can the EU and Japan help nudge Russia and China towards a more serious engagement with global governance issues? Japan is in a difficult position in this respect, since Russia and China are its immediate neighbours and it has complex issues with both countries. But this makes it all the more important for Japan that both countries become responsible members of multinational institutions, and respect global governance. Our three speakers will discuss Russia, China and global governance issues from their own varying perspectives.

Charles Grant

Charles Grant is Director of the Centre of European Reform (CER). He studied Modern History at Cambridge University and joined The Economist in 1986 where he wrote about the City. He was posted to Brussels in 1989 to cover the European Community, before becoming the Defence Editor in London from 1993. He left The Economist to become the first Director of the CER in 1998. He was a Director and Trustee of the British Council from 2002 to 2008, and is a regular contributor to the Financial Timesand The Guardian, amongst other publications. He has authored many CER publications. These includeCan Europe and China shape a new world order?(2008), Cameron’s Europe: can the Conservatives achieve their EU objectives? (2009), and Russia, China and Global Governance (2012).

Akira Imamura

Akira Imamura is Minister and Consul General at the Embassy of Japan in the UK. He was stationed in Moscow three times between the 1980s and 2000s. After graduating from Tokyo University in 1984, he served for the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He has served as Director, Russia Assistance Division (2002), and Director, Central and South Eastern Europe Division (2003), in Tokyo. During his last stay in Moscow, he gave numerous interviews to the Russian media on various themes including territorial issues and the nuclear accident in Fukushima. He has co-authored a book: The Atlas Book of Russia and CIS Countries (Diamond, Inc., 1993).

Professor Urs Matthias Zachmann

Professor Urs Matthias Zachmann is the Handa Professor of Japanese-Chinese Relations at the University of Edinburgh. He graduated from Heidelberg University (MA, PhD) and completed his Habilitation in Japanese Studies at the University of Munich. He is also qualified as an attorney at law in Germany and is a member of the bar. His fields of specialization are Japan’s international relations (with a special focus on China), law and legal sociology in East Asia, and the political and intellectual history of modern Japan. Among his most recent publications are: China and Japan in the Late Meiji Period: China Policy and the Japanese Discourse on National Identity, 1895-1904(Routledge, 2009/11) and International Law in Japan: War and Visions of International Order in the International Legal Discourse of Japan, 1919-1960 (Nomos, 2012).

Gideon Rachman (Chair)

Gideon Rachman became chief foreign affairs columnist for the Financial Times in July 2006. He joined the Financial Times after a 15-year career atThe Economist, which included spells as a foreign correspondent in Brussels, Washington and Bangkok. He also edited The Economist’s business and Asia sections. His particular interests include American foreign policy, the European Union and globalisation. He was named foreign commentator of the year in Britain’s annual Comment Awards in 2010. His first book, Zero-sum World: Politics, Power and Prosperity After the Crash (Atlantic Books) was published in 2010.

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