Factional Politics: How Dominant Parties Implode or Stabilize

5 February 2013

6:00 – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

13/14 Cornwall Terrace, Outer Circle, London, NW1 4QP

Margaret Thatcher was thrown out of office in 1990 but the British Conservatives still won a fourth term in office in 1992. Academics claimed that the British political system was ‘turning Japanese’. Within a year, Japan’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) was voted out for the first time in 38 years just as Italy’s Christian Democratic Party (DC) was imploding after four decades of hegemony. The Conservatives’ aura as the natural party of government was shattered in 1997 by Tony Blair’s New Labour but it took another 12 years for Japanese voters to vote out the LDP. Meanwhile, Canada’s Liberal Party had been in charge for some 80 years but came third in a 2011 election. Particular circumstances differed in each country but internal dissent and disorder were common. Particular circumstances differed in each country but internal dissent and disorder were common. In her book, Françoise Boucek explains how this factionalism precipitates the downfall of many political leaders but can also prolong office by containing conflict and hanging onto dissidents. In a survey of the British Conservative Party, the Liberal Party of Canada, the Christian Democratic Party of Italy and the Liberal Democratic Party of Japan, Dr Boucek explores this paradox and the potential dangers of factional politics for dominant political parties.

Dr Françoise Boucek

Dr Françoise Boucek is Teaching Fellow in European politics and policy in the School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary University of London, Visiting Professor at the University of Witten Herdecke (Germany) and Research Associate of the London School of Economics’ (LSE) Public Policy Group. She grew up in France, graduated in business administration (1973) and moved to London and then Canada where she worked as a research analyst for an investment bank. She gained her BA (1988) in political science from the University of Toronto and gained her MSc (1991) and PhD (2002) from the LSE. She was Lecturer in the Department of Politics and Modern History at London Metropolitan University (1991-93) and LSE (1994-97 and 2001-03). She has written widely about political parties, representative democracy and one-party dominance including in Japan and is co-editor of Dominant Political Parties and Democracy: Concepts, Measures, Cases and Comparisons (London: Routledge, 2010).

Professor Kensuke Takayasu

Professer Kensuke Takayasu (discussant) is Professor of Political Science at the Faculty of Law, Seikei University in Tokyo. He received his BA (1994) and MA (1996) both in political science from Waseda University. He read his doctorate at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), gaining his PhD from the University of London in 2003. He became a research fellow at Hokkaido University in 2004, before joining Seikei University as associate professor in 2006. He is currently a visiting fellow at the Department of Government, LSE. Professor Takayasu has written widely on both British and Japanese politics, and has published a book in 2009 titled The Power of Prime Ministers in Japan and Britain – Dynamics of their Relationships with the Governing Party (Tokyo: Sobunsha). His articles appear regularly in Sekai. In 2011, his paper ‘New Conventions Required: Ideas to Re-invigorate Japanese Party Politics’ was published in Asia-Pacific Review (Vol.18 Issue 2), while the website Japan Echo Web (No.7 August-September) carried his article ‘In Need of New Rules of the Game.’

BOOKING FORM

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British Music for Lute and Early Guitar: Played by Taro Takeuchi

25 September 2012, 7:00 – 8:15pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

n the Renaissance and Baroque periods, the lute and the guitar ruled as king and queen of musical instruments. The lute gained popularity in Europe during the Middle Ages and soon took on an important role in music making. In the 16th and early 17th century in Britain, the lute was much loved by nobles such as Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The Baroque guitar came to Britain in the 17th century from France. Charles II and Samuel Pepys were great lovers of the guitar. The English guitar was invented in Britain in the middle of the 18th century and instantly became popular among citizens.

In this concert respected early guitar/lute player Taro Takeuchi will perform some of the finest pieces for those instruments from the 16th, 17th and 18th century Britain. The concert will include pieces by John Dowland, Henry Purcell, Francesco Geminiani, George Frideric Handel and others.  Taro Takeuchi uses antique guitars from the 18th century as well as a faithful modern copy of an original 16th century lute.

Taro Takeuchi

Taro Takeuchi was born in Kyoto, Japan. After completing his degrees in law and music in Tokyo, he studied early music at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. He now lives in London and he has been in great demand as a soloist and ensemble player. Taro has toured most European countries, Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, the USA and Japan. As a continuo player he has worked with The English Concert, The Royal Opera House, The Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, Berlin Philharmonic, as well as Sir Simon Rattle, Rachel Podger and Nigel Kennedy. He has made numerous recordings for Deux-Elles, EMI, Hyperion Records, Harmonia Mundi, the BBC and others. His solo recordingsFolias!The Century That Shaped the Guitar andAffectuoso: Virtuoso Guitar Music from the 18th Century were received with critical acclaim and high praise.

Chinese Hordes and Human Waves: A Personal Perspective of the Korean War 1950-1953

Global Korea Lecture Series

10/11/11

TALK & BOOK LAUNCH EVENT

Chinese Hordes and Human Waves:

A Personal Perspective of the Korean War 1950-1953

Speaker: Brigadier (Retd.) B.A.H. Parritt CBE

Thursday 10 November 2011 6.30pm – 9.30pm

(Drinks Reception starts at 6pm)

Venue: Korean Cultural Centre UK, 1-3 Strand, Grand Buildings, London WC2N 5BW

 

To mark the launch of Brigadier Brian Parritt’s new book, the Embassy of the Republic of Korea cordially invites you to a lecture on his personal perspective of the Korean War.

With his long career as an intelligence officer and a British Korean War veteran, he will share his unique insights on this unfinished but forgotten war with us.

  Signed copies of his new book will be available to purchase from the publisher at the book signing after the talk.

 Brigadier Brian Parritt served as a Gunner Officer in Korea 1952-53. He took part in the Third Battle of The Hook and as the Forward Observation Officer in a company level night attack by the 1st Kings Regiment where he was wounded. He studied for three years at Hong Kong University and qualified as a First Class Interpreter in Chinese (Mandarin). He then transferred to the Intelligence Corps and held senior intelligence appointments in Libya, Cyprus, the Far East and Northern Ireland. His final tour to Northern Ireland was five years as the Director of the Intelligence Corps.

 He is the author of four books on Maritime Terrorism; a four-volume account of British Military History in the Far East in the 19th Century and a History of British Military Intelligence from the Middle Ages to 1929.

 For enquiries please contact the Press Office

T. +44 (0)207 227 5500

E. press@koreanembassy.org.uk

Manga at the British Museum

29 September 2011 – 8 April 2012

Free
Room 91 (lobby)

An exclusive opportunity to see the original drawings from the manga series Professor Munakata’s British Museum Adventure.

Hoshino Yukinobu (b.1954) is the creator of Professor Munakata, one of Japan’s most famous manga characters. Millions of readers eagerly following his adventures in the fortnightly magazine, Big Comic.

Hoshino first visited the British Museum in 2009 and was inspired to work on a Professor Munakata mystery in the unique setting of the Museum. Japanese readers followed the series for five months, first published in Big Comic, before the thrilling mystery was bought to a close with a dramatic final scene that sees the Rosetta Stone in grave danger.

All ten episodes will now be published as a book in English by the British Museum Press, and to celebrate, Hoshino has lent the Museum his finished drawings (genga) and sketches and even two of his fude brush pens which he used to draw this adventure.

In this display you can see the development ofProfessor Munakata’s British Museum Adventure from conception to finished work. This is an exceptionally rare opportunity to uncover the process of how the first British Museum manga was created.

British Museum

La ragazza Giapponese con la quale sono andato al ristorante Coreano voleva visitare il British Museum e cosi` qualche giorno fa` ho deciso di accontentarla. Il British Museum e` uno dei posti piu` interessanti da visitare a Londra ed e` gratuito, cosa da non trascurare ma, a mio parere, non il posto migliore come ‘date’. La giornata comunque e` andata molto bene, ci siamo divertiti molto specialmente a fine serata nel pub. Prossimo incontro, molto presto.

The Japanese girl I recently met wanted to go to see the British Museum so few days ago we went there for a short visit, or better, second date. The British Museum is one of the best attraction in London and is free but, in my opinion, a Museum is not the an ideal place for a date with a pretty girl. However, we had good time especially in a pub after the visit. Next date, very soon.