Keeping Japan on the Map

Keeping Japan on the Map

A one-day conference in celebration of the Sasakawa Lectureship Programme and the breadth of Japanese Studies in the UK today

Friday 18th November 2011 9.00 – 17.00

Birkbeck College, University of London Room B04 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H

The tragic events of 11 March 2011 brought Japan abruptly into international focus as the impact of the earthquake, the tsunami and the nuclear problems were played out live on TV screens. Since then, so much of the world has returned to its ordinary business and Japan appears once more to have slipped off the world map.

But what happened in Japan earlier this year and how it has been reported by the media further demonstrated that there is still much that we can learn from Japan and Japan can learn from others. Indeed, the coverage of the disaster itself, as well as programmes and articles relating to Japan that subsequently appeared on UK TV and in the media, have revealed a deep-rooted interest in Japan today.

There are a number of UK universities that have staff conducting significant research on a range of Japan-related subjects. This conference is a celebration of that work. It also provides an opportunity to show-case some of the research being conducted by a number of the Sasakawa Lecturers who were appointed following a programme of staff expansion in Japanese studies funded by a grant from the Nippon Foundation to the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation in 2008.

For further information and booking click here

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East London Tour Guide for the 2012 Olympics

In preparation for the Olympic games in 2012 this training course/module might appeal to you.

Train as an East London tour guide in time for the 2012 Olympics.

Birkbeck, University of London is to offer a new module on East London tour guiding in the run up to the 2012 Olympics.

The ten-week course has been officially endorsed by the five Olympic Boroughs, and will be held at the Museum of London in Docklands and the Bishopsgate Institute on Tuesday afternoons, starting on Tuesday 4 October. It is designed to give students hands-on training in guiding, together with an introduction to the history of East London.

The course is run by John Finn and Chris Everett, who each have ten years’ experience as badged guides and who regularly work for both the Museum of London and the London Metropolitan Archives. As well as learning practical skills, such as how to construct a walk and carry out research, students will visit sites such as West India Dock and Olympic Stratford, and learn about key phases in East London’s history, such as the Roman era, the Huguenot immigration and the Second World War. The tutors will discuss how the city has been shaped by migration and settlement from the 1880s to the present day, and examine the area’s radical past, taking in such seminal events as the Match Girls’ Strike, the Docks Strike, and the activities of the Anarchists, Suffragettes and Socialists.

At the end of the ten weeks, students will undertake a short practical exam and a presentation (with a 2,500 word research portfolio). Completion of this module qualifies the student for 15 CATS points, which are credit points recognised by Birkbeck, the Open University and the University of East London. CATS points in this and further programmes of study in London history can contribute to the equivalent of the first year of an undergraduate degree.

The cost of this module is as little as £115 for applicants who qualify for concessionary rates. A limited number of full bursaries are also available for students who have no previous higher education degree or who are in receipt of state benefit.

For further information on how to enrol contact Mike Berlin at Birkbeck on m.berlin@bbk.ac.uk or 020 7631 6647