Edwardian London Through Japanese Eyes: The Art and Writings of Yoshio Markino, 1897-1915

Book launch

By William S. Rodner

Published by BRILL

Edwardian London Through Japanese Eyes considers the career of the Japanese artist Yoshio Markino (1869-1956), a prominent figure on the early twentieth-century London art scene whose popular illustrations of British life adroitly blended stylistic elements of East and West. He established his reputation with watercolors for the avant-garde Studio magazine and attained success with The Colour of London (1907), the book that offered, in word and picture, his outsider’s response to the modern Edwardian metropolis.  Three years later he recounted his British experiences in an admired autobiography aptly titled A Japanese Artist in London. Here, and in later publications, Markino offered a distinctively Japanese perspective on European life that won him recognition and fame in a Britain that was actively engaging with pro-Western Meiji Japan. Based on a wide range of unpublished manuscripts and Edwardian commentary, this lavishly illustrated book provides a close examination of over 150 examples of his art as well analysis of his writings in English that covered topics as wide-ranging as the English and Japanese theater, women’s suffrage, current events in the Far East and observations on traditional Asian art as well as Western Post-Impressionism. Edwardian London Through Japanese Eyes, the first scholarly study of this neglected artist, demonstrates how Markino became an agent of cross-cultural understanding whose beautiful and accessible work provided fresh insights into the Anglo-Japanese relationship during the early years of the twentieth century.

Professor William S. Rodner

Professor William S. Rodner received his MA and PhD in modern British and Irish history from Pennsylvania State University where he also studied English art and architecture. As Chancellor’s Commonwealth Professor at Tidewater Community College in Virginia, he teaches a range of courses on world history. He is also editor of Scotia: Interdisciplinary Journal of Scottish Studies,sponsored by Old Dominion University. He has published widely on early twentieth-century British political thought and history and on the art of the Industrial Revolution. His J.M.W. Turner: Romantic Painter of the Industrial Revolution (University of California Press) appeared in 1997. Professor Rodner’s recent investigations into the career of Yoshio Markino, first presented in the British Art Journal and now in Edwardian London Through Japanese Eyes, reflect a long commitment to exploring the global dimensions of British visual culture.

15 May 2012

6:00 – 7:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

BOOKING FORM

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Yayoi Kusama Curator Talk by Frances Morris

24 May 2012 from 6.30pm

The Japan Foundation, London

Yayoi Kusama, with a career spanning over half a century, is undoubtedly one of the most prolific Japanese artists of her generation. From paintings to installations, her considerable body of work is very diverse, reflecting her own hybrid identity. Kusama is now Japan’s most prominent contemporary artist and presenting her work to an international audience represents an exciting and ambitious curatorial challenge.

Frances Morris, Curator and Head of Collections (International Art) at Tate Modern has conceived and led a major exhibition project to bring Kusama’s work to Tate Modern. Her long relationship with Kusama and her work has culminated in the major retrospective, Yayoi Kusama, (8 February – 5 June 2012). At this special talk event, Morris will explore Kusama and her work, considering her relevance and significance on both a global and a UK scale. Guiding the audience through her curatorial process, she will map out the exhibition from conception to completion, also reflecting on her own personal journey with Kusama, having had the opportunity to work closely with her and really get under her skin as an artist.

This promises to provide a fantastic complement to the exhibition, offering a refreshing and dynamic perspective, and an opportunity to meet the curator behind what is arguably currently the most talked-about international show in London.

This talk event has proved so popular since being announced that unfortunately it is now only possible to register to be placed on the waiting list.

To register for the waiting list, please e-mail event@jpf.org.uk with your name, details and those of any guests.

This event is organised in association with Tate Modern.

The Music of Toru Takemitsu: A talk by Noriko Ohtake

 

20 April 2012

2:00 – 3:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 4:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Toru Takemitsu (1930-1996), undoubtedly one of the most representative Japanese composers of the 20th century, conceived a unique synthesis of Japanese and Western aesthetics and, to a large extent, defined the role of the cosmopolitan artist. Highly influenced by musical languages of the West, especially Debussy, he merged in his music the Japanese philosophy of selflessness. By exploring Western musical style and by searching for his true inner self, Takemitsu succeeded in achieving individuality and universality at the same time.

In this talk, Dr Ohtake will discuss Takemitsu’s life and works and will demonstrate with music his style and sources of inspirations.

Ultimately, Takemitsu’s art cannot be classified as solely Western or Japanese, but as a unique composite of many influences.  Through his attainment of spirituality, Takemitsu conceived cosmopolitanism and the quality, which determines prominence in art by its ability to relate to human sensibility in any age and place.

Dr Noriko Ohtake

Dr Noriko Ohtake is a pianist, author and lecturer. Born in Japan, Dr Ohtake went to the United States at the age of 15 and studied the piano at the Juilliard School in New York. After graduating from Juilliard with a BM and an MM, she completed her doctoral studies at the University of Maryland. Her main teachers include Martin Canin and Thomas Schumacher. As the first prize winner of Enrico Fermi Foundation Competition, Dr Ohtake has also won the first prize at Brooklyn Arts and Culture Association Competition and the Homer Ulrich Award at the University of Maryland. She held recitals in Washington, DC sponsored by the World Bank and the IMF. After returning to Japan, she has performed in numerous recitals and chamber music concerts, specialising in contemporary Japanese composers. In 1996, she appeared on a BBC broadcast program commemorating the death of the Japanese composer Toru Takemitsu. In 1997, she made a concert tour in Chile for the centennial celebration of the relationship between Japan and Chile. Dr Ohtake’s musical publications include: Creative Sources for the Music of Toru Takemitsu (Scolar Press, London) and The Dictionary of Piano Composers and Their Compositions (Yamaha). She has translated into Japanese the Study Guide series (Zen-on) and J.S. Bach Well-Tempered Clavier (Ed. Mugellini) (Yamaha) among many others. She has also edited scores including Haydn Piano Sonatas and Schubert Drei Klavierstücke (Zen-on). Dr Ohtake currently holds positions as an associate professor of music at Sagami Women’s University and a lecturer at the Open University of Japan.

BOOKING FORM

Trees, Small Fires and Japanese Joints by Edward Allington

19 Apr 2012 to 25 May 2012

Monday – Friday, 9:30am – 5:00pm

the Japan House Gallery

Professor Edward Allington, Head of Graduate Sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art, will present a series of drawings of trees, small fires and Japanese joints. Some are based upon the famous screen by Kano Eitoku (1543 – 1590), Cypress Trees, now in the Tokyo National Museum, some from other Japanese prints, some from observation, and others from comic books and a children’s guide to Japanese carpentry.

Drawing has always been important to Allington. He collects volumes of ledgers, once used by companies for their financial records. Most are leather-bound and on extremely high quality paper. The entries, some faded, are in neat and formal manuscript. Allington draws over the rows of figures and texts, which add a layer of their own history to his ideas for sculpture or sculptural diagrams. Allington says, “Sometimes the information on the paper gives me ideas as to how the drawing might develop. But the main reason [I use ledger paper] is because these are records of everyday life. I want there to be a contradiction between my illusionistic style of drawing and the paper. If you read the writing on the paper, you have to ignore the drawing, and if you want to read the drawing, you have to ignore the writing.

 

Professor Edward Allington was born in 1951 in Troutbeck Bridge, Cumbria. He studied at Lancaster College of Art, Central Saint Martin’s School of Art and Design, and the Royal College of Art. Allington came to prominence in the early 1980s when his work was included in influential group exhibitions such as Objects and Sculpture at the Institute of Contemporary Arts (1981) and The Sculpture Show at the Hayward Gallery (1983). Since then he has exhibited widely in America, Japan and throughout Europe, and is represented in major national and international collections such as the Tate Gallery and Victoria and Albert Museum in the UK, and the Aichi Prefectural Museum in Japan. He was a Sargant Fellow at the British School in Rome (1997) and a Gregory Fellow in Sculpture at the University of Leeds (1991-93). He is a regular contributor to art magazines such asFrieze, and a book of his collected essays, A Method for Sorting Cows, was published in 1997. Allington is Head of Graduate Sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art, University College London.

Chilsu Wa Mansu

March 08, 2012

Multi Purpose Hall, KCCUK

Chilsu, a talented young artist, makes his living painting theatrical posters. He quits his job to join Mansu painting billboards. Chilsu dreams of joining his sister in the United States, but loses contact with her. Mansu’s father has long been a political prisoner. The two men spend their free time at discos and drinking with their student friend Jin-A. After Mansu’s fathers is denied leave for his hwangab, or 60th birthday celebration, and they discover that Jin-A has entered an arranged marriage, the two climb onto a roof over a billboard they have painted and begin venting their frustrations at the crowd below.

Patterns of Shadows by Pip Dickens

6 Mar 2012 to 17 Apr 2012

Monday – Friday, 9:30am – 5:00pm.

At the Daiwa Foundatin Japan House Gallery

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

“…we find beauty not in the thing itself but in the patterns of shadows, the light and the darkness, that one thing against another creates.” Jun’ichirō Tanizaki, In Praise of Shadows.

Patterns of Shadows is an exhibition of oil paintings by Pip Dickens, derived from her research in Kyoto in 2011 as part of a Leverhulme Trust Award Artist in Residence project within the Music Department of the University of Huddersfield and collaboration with composer Professor Monty Adkins. The paintings (oil on canvas) draw upon colour, pattern, rhythm and vibration, associated with kimono fabrics and katagami stencils, and frequently juxtapose these with quieter, understated greys, shadows and subtle interplays of light. These extractive works observe distinctions within Japanese visual culture – sometimes celebratory, playful and exuberant, at other times subtle, introspective and reflective.  The works are produced using bespoke tools, combs and ‘dysfunctional’ brushes to produce intriguing oscillating effects set against quieter, meditative, colour fields. Dickens draws on references such as Jun’ichirō Tanizaki’s essay on aesthetics, In Praise of Shadows, as well as her own private collection of katagami stencils and kimonos.

 

Pip Dickens (MFA Slade) is a painter concerned with visual perception, in particular, examining and challenging theories and methodologies of light and movement within the second dimension.  She has exhibited regularly in London, other areas of the UK, and also San Francisco, USA. She was shortlisted for the NatWest Art Prize (1997) and was the recipient of the Jeremy Cubitt Prize (Slade). She won the Edna Lumb Art Travel Prize (1995), and shortlisted for the Celeste Painting Prize 2009. A book – SHIBUSA-Extracting Beauty – including texts by Monty Adkins, Pip Dickens, arts writer Roy Exley and kimono designer Makoto Mori is to be published early in 2012. She also has a substantial solo exhibition, Toward the Light – Pip Dickens, at The Brindley Arts Centre, Cheshire (31 Mar – 12 May 2012), which is a Bradford Museums and Galleries touring exhibition.  www.pip-dickens.com

Artist talk: Over the Parched Field

16 February 2012

6:00 – 7:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Akiko Takizawa is a Japanese artist based in London. The exhibition, Over the Parched Field, showcases a selection of Takizawa’s photographs since 2006, including new works made especially for the exhibition. This is Takizawa’s first solo show in London.

The talk will be by Dr Simon Baker, Curator of Photography and International Art at the Tate Gallery, and the artist of Over the Parched Field, Akiko Takizawa.

Akiko Takizawa

Akiko Takizawa was born in Fukuoka in 1971 and completed her MA in Printmaking at the Royal College of Art in 2006. Her interdisciplinary practices involve not only photography but filming and performing art. Her work was selected for Bloomberg New Contemporaries in 2006 and the exhibition toured from Liverpool to London. Her work was shortlisted for the Hitotsubo Award, one of the most prestigious photographic competitions in Japan. She was also awarded the University of Abertay Visual Arts Prize (2002), the Dundee Contemporary Arts Print Studio Residency Prize (2002), the London Print Studio Award (2002) and the Printmaking Today Award (2000).

Dr Simon Baker

Dr Simon Baker is Curator of Photography and International Art at Tate. He has researched, written and curated exhibitions on surrealism, photography, and contemporary art, including the recent Tate Modern exhibitions Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance and the Camera (2010), and Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters (2011). He is currently working on a major exhibition of the works of William Klein and Daido Moriyama for Tate Modern in October 2012.