Cutty Sark re-opens to the public

The Cutty Sark has opened its doors to the paying public.

After the residents’ day, a starring role in the London Marathon and an opening ceremony attended by the Queen, it was finally a chance for the general public to see the transformation that has taken place.

On board, visitors can learn about Cutty Sark’s role in the tea trade, look up crew members from the archives, try to navigate from Australia to England and enjoy great views across London as well as look up to see eleven miles of rigging.

The iconic tea clipper, as has been well noted before, has now been raised by three metres, to create a new space below, called the Sammy Ofer Gallery, where there is the world’s largest collection of merchant navy figureheads and a new cafe.

Address: Cutty Sark Gardens, Greenwich, London SE10 9BG

10 Sinful Cities

According to Traveler’s Digest

10. Full Moon Parties, Koh Phangan Island,Thailand
Bungalows range from $2 to $20, but who wants to sleep when over 10,000 tourists flock to Haad Rin Beach, where drinks are free-pouring and DJs are spinning the best in hip-hop, techno, rap, and reggae. For show (i.e. when you are drunk and delirious by the beach), jugglers and fire-eaters entertain the crowd.

 9. Monaco
If you really want to live like a true player, then visit this grandiose and charming principality in Europe that many call the continent’s most fascinating vacation spot. Get ready to abuse the checkbook though. Did you really think royalty cuts corners?

 8. Ios, Greece
How could you omit the Greek Islands? Where generally sane, well-mannered folks congregate only to go crazy, get drunk, dance on tables and deprive themselves of sleep and all other things pure?

 7. Gold Cost, Australia
Surf’s up! Sex and alcohol blend in a wonderful orgy of vices. The Gold Coast also offers the tourists the first topless car wash alongside the Best Beauty Down Under Contest. Imagine that; beautiful girls put coins in parking meters so you can party more — it’s only fair at $13 a car wash.

 6. Goa, India (November and February)
New age enlightenment for the twenty-something crowd. Flights could fetch as much as $1000, but at $8 per room, you will have enough spending money to fly like a kite. A stay here will give new meaning to decadence. You thought Aerosmith was reckless in the 1970s? You ain’t seen nothing yet.

 5. Gatecrasher, England
Very few music festivals match the energy, adrenaline and debauchery levels shown in the Sheffield area Festival at the monstrous and epic Gatecrasher; where Trance meets Techno meets Electronica (meets sweat, drugs and alcohol). If you have ever had the fortune of visiting this event, you know what we’re talking about.

 4. Amsterdam, The Netherlands
You have to hand it to the Dutch. As hard as it might be to believe, some locals felt that the Red Light District was not organized or structured enough to greet the World’s Best. So lo and behold comes the annual Cannabis Cup in mid-November. For the recoveringtourists, visit the Seksmuseum.

 3. Las Vegas, Nevada
Okay, the original sin city has disrupted marriages before they even began, torn families apart, and probably ended a few lives ominously. What else could you possibly ask for? Oh and it’s also the setting of many a great movie about partying hardy.

 2. New Orleans, Louisiana
The city’s spicy food is great, its historic blues music is even better, its lax (more like nonexistent) drinking laws are a lifesaver as bars are open 24 hours a day. This sin city has rapidly dislodged and out-Vegased Las Vegas… no small feat. Of course, it helps to have a Mardi Gras, a.k.a show your boobs for my beads event in the streets.

 1. Pattaya, Thailand
Government officials refer to their city as the “Sexual Disneyland”; the mantra is “if you can suck it, use it, eat it, feel it, taste it or abuse it, Pattaya never sleeps and it is the best resort for you.” Three million visitors flock here every year to partake in casual sex and sexual freedom in the city’s 275 hotels and 35,000 rooms (which range between $10 to $80 a night).

Fukushima Colours

3 May 2012

6:00 – 7:00pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Fukushima Colours

Published by Langenskiöld

By Elin Lindqvist

The catastrophe on 11 March 2011 has had a deep impact on the Japanese society, and on our global world. Almost twenty thousand people were left dead or missing after the disaster, and the tsunami destroyed entire communities. It will take years for the full extent of the nuclear crisis’ impact on Japan to become clear. Yet, a year after the tsunami, it is possible to see some of the consequences that the disaster has had on agriculture, the fishing industry, people’s health and research about renewable energy sources.

In her reportage book Fukushima Colours, multilingual author Elin Lindqvist has documented the aftermath of the crisis, in collaboration with Japanese journalist Yuko Ota, and Japanese photographer Yoshikazu Fukuda. She has closely followed eight individuals or groups of individuals representing different parts of Japanese society all through 2011, in order to see how people affected by the crisis have recovered. Through these individual stories, we hear the emergence of a common voice striving towards a more sustainable and ecological future in Japan.         

* The book will be available on the day at the discounted price of £18.

Elin Lindqvist

Elin Lindqvist was born in Tokyo in 1982 and currently lives in England. She has studied at New York University in New York and Sophia University in Tokyo. She is an international writer, and has published three novels in Swedish (Tokyo natt, 2002; Tre röda näckrosor, 2005 and Facklan, 2009). She also works as a freelance journalist, dramaturge and translator. In the spring of 2011, she reported about the catastrophe in Japan for Sweden’s largest newspaper Aftonbladet, and she wrote about the aftermath of the crisis for leading daily newspapersSvenska Dagbladet in Sweden and Aftenposten in Norway.

Dr Akira Matsuda

Dr Akira Matsuda studies the relationship between archaeology – and more broadly cultural heritage – and the general public from anthropological and sociological points of view. He is currently doing research into the representation of damage caused by natural disasters in Japan over the last 500 years. Matsuda completed his PhD in public archaeology at University College London in 2009. He worked as a project-based consultant in UNESCO’s Division of Cultural Heritage in 2004 and 2005, and was a Handa Japanese Archaeology Fellow at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures from January 2009 to August 2011. Since 2010, he has been teaching at the School of World Art Studies and Museology, UEA, and most recently co-edited a book, New Perspectives in Global Public Archaeology (Springer, 2011) with Okamura Katsuyuki. He is the Membership Secretary of the World Archaeological Congress, and is now working on the publication of a book on cultural heritage in East Asia.

BOOKING FORM

North Korean Human Rights Film Festival ‘Kimjongilia’

Date: 27 April 2012, 6pm

Title: Kimjongilia (2009)

Director: N.C. Heikin

Running time: 76min (Eng subs)

Venue: Multi-purpose Hall, Korean Cultural Centre UK

          (No bookings required)

Organised by Christian Solidarity Worldwide

About the Film

North Korea is one of the world's most isolated nations. For sixty years, North Koreans have been governed by a totalitarian regime that controls all information entering and leaving the country. A cult of personality surrounds its two recent leaders: first, Kim Il Sung, and now his son, Kim Jong Il. For Kim Jong Il's 46th birthday, a hybrid red begonia named kimjongilia was created, symbolizing wisdom, love, justice, and peace. The film draws its name from the rarefied flower and reveals the extraordinary stories told by survivors of North Korea's vast prison camps, of devastating famine, and of every kind of repression. All of the interviews featured took place in South Korea, where the defectors now live. Their experiences are interspersed with archival footage of North Korean propaganda films and original scenes that illuminate the contours of daily life for a people whose every action is monitored and whose every thought could bring official retribution. Along with the survivors' stories, Kimjongilia examines the mass illusion possible under totalitarianism and the human rights abuses required to maintain that illusion. Ultimately, the defectors are inspiring, for despite the extremes they have suffered, they still hold out hope for a better future.

Concert: Toki Quartet

26 April 2012, 7:00 – 8:30pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The Toki Quartet was formed by four prize-winning musicians in 2010 at the Royal Academy of Music. They have studied with Martin Outram (Maggini Quartet), and the Vanburgh Quartet, among many others. The group were highly commended in the Sir Arthur Bliss Prize in 2010 and were selected by Peter Manning to perform at the 2011 MasterPiece Fair in Chelsea. They have also been selected to perform pieces by contemporary composers such as David Lumsdane and Steve Reich, in which the latter culminated in a CD recording produced by the Royal Academy of Music. In July 2012 they look forward to working with the composer Nicola LeFanu. Their experience of performing alongside the Scottish Ensemble and the Chillingarian Quartet, and individually with Nobuko Imai and Stephan Picard, has fostered their great interest to explore chamber music further. The Tokis enjoy an ever-expanding performance schedule and are currently planning a tour through England and Japan to promote the link between British and Japanese music. Toki Quartet website.

The concert will include pieces by Kosaku Yamada, Frank Bridge, Toru Takemitsu and Edward Elgar.

Aki Sawa (1st violin)

Born in Tokyo, Aki obtained her BMus with the highest ever marks from Tokyo Geidai. She won major prizes at university, and also obtained the 2nd prize at the International Bach Competition in Paris. Aki is now studying for her MA in Performance with Professor Gyorgy Pauk at the Royal Academy of Music, where she has been awarded major prizes and awards. She was a member of the London Symphony Orchestra String Experience Scheme 2010/2011.

Midori Komachi (2nd violin)

Midori is currently undertaking the Master of Music programme at the Royal Academy of Music, studying with Maurice Hasson. At the age of 12, she studied at Basel Music University in Switzerland with Adelina Oprean. She has appeared as a soloist with the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, and has performed recitals in major venues including Warsaw Philharmonic Hall, St Martin-in-the-Fields, St.George’s Bristol and Muza Kawasaki. She has won many awards from the Royal Academy of Music and the Hattori Foundation.

Steve Doman (viola)

Steve was awarded a scholarship to attend Wells Cathedral School at the age of sixteen, where his viola teacher was Patricia Noall. He then went on to study with Mark Knight at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and is currently studying for his Masters degree at the Royal Academy of Music in London with Garfield Jackson. He recently took part in an Erasmus exchange to the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki to study with Pirkko Simojoki.

Amy Jolly (cello)

A student of Josephine Knight at the Royal Academy of Music, Amy will tour to South Korea with the Sainsbury Academy Soloists and will perform in New York and at the London Proms 2012 with the Academy/Juilliard Symphony Orchestra. Amy performs extensively with her duo partner Mari Kawamura and is a recipient of the Birmingham Royal Ballet Mentorship Scheme.

BOOKING FORM

Political Leadership in the UK and Japan

24 April 2012

6:00 – 7:45pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:45pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The next seminar in our 2012 series Leadership: People and Power in the UK and Japan looks at political leadership. The governing party changed in Japan in 2009 and the UK in 2010. In both cases, the new ruling party had spent a prolonged period out of power, and its leaders have had to forge a coalition to achieve a majority. Japan has plenty of experience of coalition governments, but its political leaders have often been criticised for ineffective leadership, and faced particular challenges following the earthquake last spring. What can the two countries learn from each other about political leadership? And to what extent are different leadership styles required by the different institutional set-ups in each country?

Taro Kono

Taro Kono is a Japanese Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) politician and a 5th term Member of the House of Representatives in the Diet. Born in 1963, Kono graduated from Georgetown University with a Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service. While in Washington, DC, Kono served for then Democratic Congressman Richard Shelby of Alabama for two years. Kono joined Fuji Xerox in 1986, moved to Fuji Xerox Asia Pacific in Singapore in 1991, and subsequently served as Managing Director at Nippon Tanshi from 1993 to 1996. Kono served in Prime Minister Koizumi’s final government as Senior Vice Minister of Justice from 2005 to 2006. Until the LDP defeat in the General Election in August 2009, Kono was the Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the House of the Representatives. In September 2009 he ran for the Leadership of the LDP and lost to Sadakazu Tanigaki.

Professor Keith Grint

Professor Keith Grint is Professor of Public Leadership and Management at Warwick University. He is also a Visiting Research Professor at Lancaster University, an Associate Fellow of the Saïd Business School, a Fellow of the Windsor Leadership Trust, a Fellow of the Sunningdale Institute, and a Visiting Scholar at Sydney University. He is a founding co-editor of the Sage journalLeadership, and also co-edits the Sage Handbook of Leadership. He has written on various aspects of leadership, including: leadership theory (Leadership: Limits and Possibilities, 2005); historical aspects of leadership (The Arts of Leadership, 2001); leadership in the military (Leadership, Management and Command: Rethinking D-Day, 2008); and leadership in the public sector (The Public Leadership Challenge) (forthcoming) (ed. with Stephen Brookes). He wrote the literature review for ‘Strengthening Leadership in the Public Sector’ (2000) a project of the Performance and Innovation Unit (Cabinet Office).