Coriolanus: A Talk by Globe to Globe Festival Director Tom Bird

5 April 2012

4:30 – 5:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 6:30pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Chiten theatre company brings the first ever Japanese production to Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, a unique event in the history of Japanese art in the UK.

This celebrated company from Kyoto works under the direction of one of Japan’s most imaginative artists, Motoi Miura. Known for its minimalist and avant-garde vision, the company produces an expressive theatre rooted in the exploration of words, sound and the human body. Originally formed in Tokyo, Chiten moved to Kyoto in 2005. Under the directorship of Motoi Miura, the company is particularly celebrated for its highly contemporary stagings of the works of Chekhov.

Coriolanus is Shakespeare’s greatest political play. The competing claims of democracy and aristocracy are conveyed in harsh and stony language and with relentless speed and single-mindedness. At its heart, however, there unfolds a personal tragedy of one man’s emotional blindness.

Coriolanus is one of the productions within Globe to Globe – all 37 of Shakespeare’s plays in 37 different languages in a kaleidoscopic, six-week festival at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. The Globe to Globe Festival starts on 21 April 2012, with Coriolanus being performed by the Chiten theatre company on 21 and 22 May. For more information, visit: http://globetoglobe.shakespearesglobe.com.

Tom Bird, Director of the Globe to Globe Festival at Shakespeare’s Globe, will discuss his job over the last one and a half years of putting together the world’s largest and most ambitious Shakespeare festival – including the challenges, adventures and characters he’s encountered on the way. In particular he will discuss his travels in Japan and the Globe’s relationship with Chiten in a special event held at Daiwa Foundation Japan House.

Tom Bird

Tom Bird is Director of the Globe to Globe Festival at Shakespeare’s Globe. In producing the festival, he has travelled the world from Armenia to Zanzibar in search of Shakespeare. He has worked for the Globe since 2007. Previous employment includes work for the ground-breaking physical theatre festival Aurora Nova at Edinburgh and for a number of music groups, most notably the Northern Sinfonia. Tom’s roots are in the north-east, and as a playwright he is a regular contributor to Live Theatre’s Short Cutsevents in Newcastle. His short play Kaz and the Cootswas recorded for the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival in 2009. He was educated at the universities of Edinburgh and Copenhagen.

BOOKING FORM

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The Appeal of Mino Washi

2 April 2012

6:00 – 7:30pm, followed by a drinks reception to 8:00pm

Daiwa Foundation Japan House

Mino washi (traditional Japanese paper from Mino City) has a proud tradition of more than 1,300 years and has a fine fibre texture that is highly regarded as beautiful and robust. Mino washi is made from the raw materialkozo (a native Japanese mulberry tree), and carefully processed without the use of chemicals with skilled craftsmen using traditional and time honoured processes, such as drying out in the sun.

Satoshi Hasegawa is an artisan manufacturing paper in Mino City in Gifu Prefecture. The technique he uses to make washi, is a traditional process native to the Mino region using domestic materials. His main product is the high quality ‘Usu Mino Thin Paper’ which is widely used to repair ancient cultural treasures such as manuscripts and texts in art galleries and museums at home and abroad.

Upon receiving a commission from the Ruthin Craft Centre where his skills are highly valued, Mr Hasegawa has supplied the centre with 600 sheets of Mino washi for the creation of a sculptural space at the exhibition,Japanese Style: Sustaining Design. The exhibition will take place at the Ruthin Craft Centre in Wales from 1 April to 24 June 2012 (www.japanseasonwales.com).

Mr Hasegawa believes “Paper in itself may just be a material, but it is my ongoing mission to continue and develop this work, and to connect the tradition with the next generation”.

This special event at Daiwa Foundation Japan House will begin with opening remarks from Mr Kazuyoshi Kano, Vice Mayor of Mino City and Mr Akira Watanabe, Executive Director, Department of Industry Promotion, Mino City.

Satoshi Hasegawa

Satoshi Hasegawa was born in 1964. In 1991, he studied under the late foremost craftsman of Minowashi, Kozo Furuta, who was dedicated to making traditional papermaking for more than fifty years. Hasegawa established his own studio in 1993. In 2003 he was designated by the Japanese national body The Association for the Promotion of Traditional Craft Industries as a “traditional craftsman”.

Zoë Howard

Zoë Howard graduated from the University of Brighton in 2011 with a BA (Hons) in Fine Art Printmaking. She developed a deep interest in Japanese art and culture, in particular washi, after a study exchange to Nagoya University of Arts, Japan in 2010. Since then, she has completed an artist in residence at the Mino Paper Art Village Project, exploring ideas of light and space, movement and stillness through the manipulation of handmade Mino washi. She is currently based in London and is continuing to develop work using Japanese paper.

Chiang Mai Fest 2012

March 23 to April 7, 2012
At the Three Kings Monument, Chiang Mai

Earth Wind and Fire and the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) are joining hands to reintroduce the Chiang Mai Fest to the cultural surroundings of the Three Kings Monument from March 23 to April 7, 2012.

Yut Wanichanond, Consultant of Earth Wind and Fire, said following a much-hyped inaugural year in 2011 as a three-day event, the Chiang Mai Fest would return this year with 16 days of packed programmes. “The Chiang Mai Fest 2012 will be even bigger, starting with the First International Street Painting Festival in Thailand,” he said.

The inaugural Street Painting Festival will bring in world-famous chalk painters such as Melanie Van Latum and Lysa Ashley from the USA and Tony Cuboliquido from Italy to turn streets, pavements and temporary walls at the Three Kings Monument into an outdoor art exhibition and workshop from March 23 to April 7.

The “Art on Street” exhibition will start with a curtain raiser at the Old District Court on Friday, 23 March from 17.00 to 18.00 hrs. The Chiang Mai Fest 2012 will also reintroduce the city’s first and only International Music Festival from April 6- 7.

In its second year, the two-day event will feature world-class performances by international artists such as German contemporary singer Thomas Kiessling, South African opera – classic pop crossover male vocal group Il Quinto, American Blues and Soul revivalist band Blues Brothers and Thai musical maestro Neung Jakkawal.

Last year, the three-day Chiang Mai Fest attracted nearly 10,000 visitors and generated 150 million Baht revenue to Chiang Mai, as well as boosted tourists’ length of stay in the city from 2 to 15 days during the Songkran Festival.

“This year, we expect the 16-day Chiang Mai Fest to attract over 35,000 local and international visitors and help to generate some 200-300 million Baht in tourism-related revenue,” Yut Wanichanond added.

Mr Wiwatchai Boonyapak, Events Department Director of the Tourism Authority of Thailand, said the Chiang Mai Fest 2012 would attract more tourists to Chiang Mai between late-March and early-April in addition to the expected high turnouts during the Songkran Festival.

“The Chiang Mai Fest 2012 will boost tourism revenue and raise the image of Chiang Mai as the centre of international music, art and culture,” Mr Wiwatchai said.

For more information, please contact
Tel: +66 (0) 53 292 224
E-mail: info@wind-and-fire.com
Web site: www.chiangmaifest.com

Japanese from Scratch: Let’s Eat Japanese Food!

28 March 2012 from 6.00pm

The Japan Foundation London (later moving on to a local Japanese restaurant)

Get a flavour of the Japanese language while enjoying authentic Japanese food!

Japanese from Scratch is a new Japanese language and culture workshop from the Japan Foundation London, suitable for those who are interested in learning Japanese but haven’t started yet, or those who have just started learning.

This month’s workshop theme is “Let’s Eat Japanese Food!”

The course will teach you to:
:: Identify different kinds of Japanese food, by their correct Japanese name
:: Exchange simple greetings in Japanese and say basic phrases with appropriate manners
:: Use chopsticks correctly and elegantly
:: Eat Japanese food like a connoisseur

In this workshop, you can learn how to:

  • Identify different kinds of Japanese food, by their correct Japanese name
  • Exchange simple greetings in Japanese and say basic phrases with appropriate manners
  • Use chopsticks correctly and elegantly
  • Eat Japanese food like a connoisseur

The course will be led by Seiji Fukushima, Chief Japanese Language Advisor at the Japan Foundation London. Instructions and explanations will be in English. Please click here for more information, including the timetable.

The course fee is £20.00, which includes an authentic Japanese meal at a London restaurant. This must be paid in cash on the day of the event. Please note that the dishes served at this event are representative of typical Japanese cuisine, and vegetarian options are limited.

Advance booking is essential. This workshop is limited to 25 people – first come, first served.

The deadline to apply is March 21st.

For more information click here.

Japan — 日本

JAPAN — 日本

Presso COMBINES XL  GALLERY,

via Montevideo, 9

Mostra fotografica e presentazione del libro – progetto realizzato lungo un viaggio durato 12 mesi in Giappone  .

Vernissage: 8 marzo 2012 ore 18.30 /22.30 – Cocktail by Midori

Sound Curated by Kisk (Apparel Music)

‎Combines XL Gallery , l’associazione atelier spazio Xpo’  e Spazi Possibili sono lieti di comunicare l’evento charity che inaugurerà l’8 marzo-2012.

Si tratta della mostra fotografica e presentazione del libro intitolato:

JAPAN — 日本

Autori e fotografi: Tina Bagué (Barcelona, 1974), Toru Morimoto (Akashi, Japan, 1972)

Testi di: Carlos Rubio, Tina Bagué,Toru Morimoto

Un momento importante di analisi e riflessione per immagini sul Giappone contemporaneo, a quasi un anno di distanza dalla prima catastrofe seguita in diretta con i canali web 2.0 da tutto il mondo tecnologicamente sviluppato.

Si tratta dell’ opening di una mostra fotografica di scatti realizzati durante un progetto itinerante che raccontano un Giappone inconsueto dai clichè. Scatti a colori e bianco e nero realizzati lungo un viaggio  affrontato dai due fotografi, durato 42.000 KM, per 12 mesi.

La mostra sarà introdotta da Christian Gancitano, esperto di culture “asian pop”, arte, costume  e società giapponesi che parlerà di questo interessante progetto di qualità ma anche dell’attuale situazione del Giappone, del movimento antinuclearista che sta crescendo in modo significativo, della percezione dei problemi che questa grande nazione ha considerato primari subito dopo il grande terremoto e la “grande onda” TSUNAMI, già prevista peraltro dalle stampe “Ukiyo-e” con il famoso soggetto de “la grande onda” di Hokusai. Una nazione che si pone il problema dell’approvvigionamento  energetico e di mantenimento dello sviluppo economico, che dopo le bombe atomiche subite durante la seconda guerra mondiale ha saputo divenire la seconda potenza economica mondiale, superata di recente solo dalla Cina.

Un fotografo giapponese e una fotografa di Barcelona, una relazione ideale tra lo sguardo orientale e occidentale che spesso si fondono e si confrontano, per raccontare con le immagini il Giappone attuale nella sua realtà ancora “fluttuante” e per molti aspetti tutta da scoprire.

Mostra fotografica e catalogo tradotto in 4 lingue (inglese, spagnolo, giapponese e francese)

Il 10% del ricavato della vendita delle fotografie andrà alla prefettura di Fukushima in beneficienza ai bambini rimasti orfani dopo la tragedia dello TSUNSAMI dell’11-marzo-2011.

Il libro-catalogo è stato presentato per la prima volta il 31 ottobre 2011
presso l’importante galleria di Konica Minolta Plaza a Tokyo, insieme alla mostra.

La seconda release è stata presso la Galleria “The Private Space” di Barcellona nel novembre 2011. Finalmente il progetto arriva in italia.

Presso COMBINES XL  GALLERY

Via Montevideo, 9 – Milano

opening: 8 marzo 2012 ore 18.30 /22.30

interverranno gli autori

esposizione dall’8 marzo al 14 aprile 2012

INFO: 02 8323229

Per maggiori informazioni sul progetto cliccare qui.

Lessons from Japan’s Disaster

22 March 2012, 6:00 – 7:00pm

Chatham House, 10 St James’s Square, London SW1Y 4LE

The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 inflicted unprecedented damage on Japan. The social and economic turmoil continues to this day. The disaster exceeded all assumptions that the nation had made to date, unleashing catastrophic damage of unimaginable magnitude. The release of radioactive substances into the environment from the troubled Fukushima nuclear power plant has spread fear about the contamination of agricultural products and about other ramifications. Power shortages caused by reduced electricity generating capacity have extended economic disruption far beyond the areas immediately affected to the country as a whole. Japan’s experience is under scrutiny around the world from the perspective of crisis management. Meanwhile, in the wake of the disaster, people from all over the world extended warm support and encouragement to Japan. This resulted in Japan becoming the world’s largest recipient of aid for the year 2011. (Lessons from the Disaster: Risk management and the compound crisis presented by the Great East Japan Earthquake, edited by Yoichi Funabashi and Heizo Takenaka, The Japan Times, 2011)

The editors of the book believe that they can best repay the world for its interest and concern by reporting on the lessons Japan has learned from the disaster. In the seminar, Professor Takenaka will argue that the current crisis is a “comprehensively linked crisis” and will examine the impact the disaster inflicted on the Japanese economy as a whole, while Dr Funabashi will discuss the “failure” of the governance, calling the nuclear emergency at Fukushima a “man-made crisis”.

Dr Yoichi Funabashi

Dr Yoichi Funabashi is the former Editor-in-Chief and Columnist for the Asahi Shimbun. While at theAsahi Shimbun, Dr Funabashi was selected a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and was appointed Visiting Fellow at the Institute for International Economics and Distinguished Guest Fellow at The Brookings Institution. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the International Crisis Group and currently serves as Director of the Rebuild Japan Initiative Foundation. Funabashi graduated from the University of Tokyo and acquired his PhD from Keio University, where he is currently Guest Professor.

Professor Heizo Takenaka

Professor Heizo Takenaka is a graduate of Hitotsubashi University, where he earned a BA in Economics. After graduation, he joined the Japan Development Bank and later worked as Senior Economist in the Japanese Ministry of Finance. He was also a Visiting Associate Professor at Harvard University. During the period 2001–2006, Takenaka served in the Cabinet of Prime Minister Koizumi as Minister of State for Economic and Fiscal Policy, Minister of State for Financial Services, Minister of State for Privatization of the Postal Services, and Minister of Internal Affairs and Communications. Takenaka has a PhD in Economics from Osaka University, and is a professor in the Faculty of Policy Management at Keio University.