iphone 4s

Domanda: mi consigliate di comprare iphone 4s o aspettare iphone 5?

Question: should I buy the iphone 4s or should I wait for the iphone 5?

FLOODING IN THAILAND: SITUATION UPDATE

(27/10/2011)

The flooding in Thailand is mainly affecting the central provinces along the Chao Phraya River including Bangkok and Ayutthaya. Other popular tourist destinations in the central region including Pattaya, Hua Hin, Kanchanaburi, and Koh Chang have not been affected by the floods. Flood waters in several provinces in northern Thailand have begun to subside. Provinces in the south of Thailand have not been affected by the floods.

Most areas of central Bangkok where tourists normally go are not flooded. The Chao Phraya River, which runs through Bangkok, is at a higher-than-normal level. This is causing some flooding at tourist attractions that are close to the river.

In the greater Bangkok Metropolitan Area, several suburbs and areas adjacent to the Chao Phraya River are experiencing flooding. As these areas are largely residential and industrial zones, they are not normally visited by tourists.

The TAT advises visitors to contact the TAT Information Line at 1672; check the latest reports in the local media; or get an update from the staff of the accommodations where they are staying if they are planning to visit tourist attractions that are located close to the Chao Phraya River.

Transportation:
Tourist destinations in the north, such as Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, and Sukhothai, are best accessed by air as some roads and railways in the central provinces are closed due to the floods. Provinces in southern and eastern Thailand remain fully accessible by road and train.

Tourists planning to travel to areas affected by the floods are advised to check the latest weather forecasts for their destination and confirm arrangements with the transportation providers with which they will be travelling. Tourists can call the TAT Information Line at 1672 to check local conditions, or visit the Thailand Meteorological Department web site at http://www.tmd.go.th/en for updated weather forecasts.

In & Around Bangkok: 
–Transportation from Suvarnabhumi Airport into central Bangkok including taxis, buses and the Airport Link have not been affected by the floods and are operating normally.
— Transportation in most areas within central Bangkok including taxis, tuk-tuks, the BTS and the MRT are also operating normally.
— In the areas affected by flooding, public transportation is being rerouted in some areas and the availability of taxis is limited.

Airports:
— Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok has not been affected by the floods and is operating as per usual. The airport has considerable flood protection measures in place and officials are monitoring the situation closely.
— Don Mueang Airport, which is located in a northern suburb of Bangkok and handles domestic airlines serving a small number of provinces, has been closed until November 1st due to flooding.
— All other airports in Thailand are open and operating normally.

Roads:
–Highway 32, also known as The Asian Highway (AH-2), in central Thailand is partly affected by the floods. Inter-provincial buses between Bangkok and the north and northeast of Thailand are operating, but subject to detours and extended travel times.
— Inter-provincial buses to eastern, western, and southern Thailand are operating as per normal.

Train services:
–Train services from Bangkok to northern destinations are suspended due to the tracks being flooded. The State Railway of Thailand (SRT) is offering full refunds on tickets for travelers who want to cancel their trips to destinations where train service is suspended.
–Train services to other parts of Thailand are operating as per normal.

Useful Contact Numbers: 
TAT Call Center: 1672
Thai Airways: +66 (0) 2356 1111
Bangkok Airways: +66 (0) 2265 8777
AirAsia: +66 (0) 2515 9999
Nok Air: 1318 or +66 (0) 2900 9955
Orient Thai Airlines: 1126
State Railway of Thailand (SRT) Call Center: 1690
Transport Co.,Ltd. Hotline:(Inter-provincial bus service) 1490

Major tourist destinations not affected by the floods include:

North:
Chiang Mai
Chiang Rai
Lampang
Sukhothai

Northeast:
Loei
Ubon Ratchathani
Nakhon Ratchasima
Udon Thani

Central:
Hua-Hin, Prachuap Khiri Khan
Pattaya, Chonburi
Kanchanaburi
Ratchaburi
Ko Chang, Trat
Rayong

South:
Chumphon
Phuket
Krabi
Ranong
Nakhon Si Thammarat
Songkhla
Narathiwat
Satun
Pattani
Surat Thani
Phang Nga
Trang
Phatthalung
Yala

English-language sources:
The Government Public Relations Department
Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA)

Thai- language sources:
Flood Relief Operations Center 
BMA Flood Control Center 
Airports of Thailand
State Railway of Thailand

English-language newspapers offering continuous updates on the flooding situation:
Bangkok Post
The Nation

Source: Tourism Authorithy of Thailand (TAT)

Manga: Professor Munakata’s British Museum adventure

Friday 25 November 18.30

Hoshino Yukinobu is one of Japan’s leading manga artists – a Japanese form of graphic novel.

In a unique collaboration with the British Museum Hoshino has created a compelling adventure that revolves around Professor Munakata’s attempts to unravel the mystery of the missing Stonehenge megaliths and the threats to the British Museum’s treasured holdings.

Hoshino’s original work was featured in a Room 3 display in 2009. Nicole Rousmaniere, British Museum, discusses the creation of this manga and places it in the larger context of the medium. Introduced by Paul Gravett, Director of Comica Festival and editor of 1001 Comics You Must Read Before You Die. This event marks the publication of Professor Manakata’s British Museum Adventure in English.

Followed by a pay bar.

£5, Members and concessions £3

Manga at the British Museum

29 September 2011 – 8 April 2012

Free
Room 91 (lobby)

An exclusive opportunity to see the original drawings from the manga series Professor Munakata’s British Museum Adventure.

Hoshino Yukinobu (b.1954) is the creator of Professor Munakata, one of Japan’s most famous manga characters. Millions of readers eagerly following his adventures in the fortnightly magazine, Big Comic.

Hoshino first visited the British Museum in 2009 and was inspired to work on a Professor Munakata mystery in the unique setting of the Museum. Japanese readers followed the series for five months, first published in Big Comic, before the thrilling mystery was bought to a close with a dramatic final scene that sees the Rosetta Stone in grave danger.

All ten episodes will now be published as a book in English by the British Museum Press, and to celebrate, Hoshino has lent the Museum his finished drawings (genga) and sketches and even two of his fude brush pens which he used to draw this adventure.

In this display you can see the development ofProfessor Munakata’s British Museum Adventure from conception to finished work. This is an exceptionally rare opportunity to uncover the process of how the first British Museum manga was created.

Dealing with Disaster in Japan: Flight JL123 Crash

Book launch

Published by Routledge, 2011

By Christopher P. Hood

Just as the sinking of the Titanic is embedded in the public consciousness in the English-speaking world, so the crash of JAL flight JL123 is part of the Japanese collective memory. The 1985 crash involved the largest loss of life for any single air crash in the world. 520 people, many of whom had been returning to their ancestral home for the Obon religious festival, were killed; there were only four survivors.

This book tells the story of the crash, discusses the many controversial issues surrounding it, and considers why it has come to have such importance for many Japanese. It shows how the Japanese responded to the disaster: trying to comprehend how a faulty repair may have caused the crash, and the fact that rescue services took such a long time to reach the remote crash site; how the bereaved dealt with their loss; how the media in Japan and in the wider world reported the disaster; and how the disaster is remembered and commemorated. The book highlights the media coverage of anniversary events and the Japanese books and films about the crash; the very particular memorialisation process in Japan, alongside Japanese attitudes to death and religion; it points out in what ways this crash both reflects typical Japanese behaviour and in what ways the crash is unique.

* The book will be available on the day at 30% off the retail price.   

 

Dr. Christopher P. Hood is a Reader in Japanese Studies at Cardiff University, UK. His publications include:Shinkansen: From Bullet Train to Symbol of Modern JapanJapanese Education Reform: Nakasone’s Legacyand (as editor) the four-volume Politics of Modern Japan (all published by Routledge).

A new theme?

E’ da un po’ di tempo che ci sto pensando, forse e’ arrivato il momento di cambiare aspetto a questo Blog. Durante questo fine settimana decidero’ cosa fare. Il theme ‘Enterprise’ mi piace pero’, dopo quasi un anno, forse e’ arrivato il momento di dare un aspetto un po’ diverso a questo Blog. Al momento i due themes che preferisco sono ‘Skeptical‘ e ‘ITheme2‘; vediamo quale dei due si adatta meglio a questo Blog. Qualche consiglio?

Ps: mi sono reso conto che e’ passato tanto tempo dal mio ultimo post scritto in Italiano, nelle prossime settimane cerchero’ di usare la mia lingua madre piu’ spesso.

I think that its about time to give this Blog a new and refreshed appearance even if the theme ‘Enterprise’ has been used for less than a year and fits well with the needs of this Blog. As I’m not very familiar with blogs, to decide which theme to use has been a difficult task and at the present I’m thinking to use either the theme ‘Skeptical‘ or the newest ‘ITheme2‘; over this weekend I’ll decide. Any advise?